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Charlotte Amalie
Sunday, June 26, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesIs Season's First Named Storm on The Way?

Is Season's First Named Storm on The Way?

While Tropical Depression 2 fizzled into a low pressure area Thursday afternoon, another low pressure area about 250 miles south of the Cape Verde Islands could be a hurricane by Wednesday or Thursday, meteorologist Roham Abtahi at the National Weather Service in San Juan said Thursday.
"That’s the main story right now. It’s going to come very close to our area. One model has it going directly over Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands," he said.
The National Hurricane Center gives it a better than 50 percent chance of developing into a what it terms a tropical cyclone within the next couple of days as it makes its way across the Atlantic. It’s moving west at 10 to 15 mph.
Abtahi cautioned that there is plenty of uncertainty in forecasts this far out, but said that once the low starts to circulate its path will be clearer.
Additionally, once it reaches 55 degrees west latitude hurricane hunter airplanes will start flying into it to get a better handle on its strength, Abtahi said.
Closer to home, after thunder, lightning and some rain occurred Wednesday night thanks to a tropical wave passing through the area, Thursday saw gusty winds across the territory. At Weather Station Zephyr, located at Ajax Peak, St. John, a gust topped out at 34 mph at 7:45 a.m.
Abtahi said late Thursday afternoon that skies are clearing and the wave is moving out of the area.
As for the remnants of Tropical Depression 2, Abtahi said dry air caused it to lose most of its convection. It is expected to continue on its westward track but not regain its strength. This means the Virgin Islands could expect some wet weather early next week.
As of the 5 p.m. update from the National Hurricane Center, the remnants of Tropical Depression 2 were centered at 14.2degrees north latitude and 38.3 degrees west longitude. Winds have fallen to 30 mph, with the barometric pressure standing at 1008 millibars or 29.77 inches. It was moving west at 8 mph.
What’s left of TD 2 was located about 930 miles west of the Cape Verde Islands.
Abtahi urged residents to complete their hurricane plans if they haven’t already done so.
"This should serve as a warning," he said.

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While Tropical Depression 2 fizzled into a low pressure area Thursday afternoon, another low pressure area about 250 miles south of the Cape Verde Islands could be a hurricane by Wednesday or Thursday, meteorologist Roham Abtahi at the National Weather Service in San Juan said Thursday.
"That's the main story right now. It's going to come very close to our area. One model has it going directly over Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands," he said.
The National Hurricane Center gives it a better than 50 percent chance of developing into a what it terms a tropical cyclone within the next couple of days as it makes its way across the Atlantic. It's moving west at 10 to 15 mph.
Abtahi cautioned that there is plenty of uncertainty in forecasts this far out, but said that once the low starts to circulate its path will be clearer.
Additionally, once it reaches 55 degrees west latitude hurricane hunter airplanes will start flying into it to get a better handle on its strength, Abtahi said.
Closer to home, after thunder, lightning and some rain occurred Wednesday night thanks to a tropical wave passing through the area, Thursday saw gusty winds across the territory. At Weather Station Zephyr, located at Ajax Peak, St. John, a gust topped out at 34 mph at 7:45 a.m.
Abtahi said late Thursday afternoon that skies are clearing and the wave is moving out of the area.
As for the remnants of Tropical Depression 2, Abtahi said dry air caused it to lose most of its convection. It is expected to continue on its westward track but not regain its strength. This means the Virgin Islands could expect some wet weather early next week.
As of the 5 p.m. update from the National Hurricane Center, the remnants of Tropical Depression 2 were centered at 14.2degrees north latitude and 38.3 degrees west longitude. Winds have fallen to 30 mph, with the barometric pressure standing at 1008 millibars or 29.77 inches. It was moving west at 8 mph.
What's left of TD 2 was located about 930 miles west of the Cape Verde Islands.
Abtahi urged residents to complete their hurricane plans if they haven't already done so.
"This should serve as a warning," he said.