Archaeology Open House Brings the Past to Life

Intern Armani Doward displays a bottle he found while walking through the grounds. It is possibly an early rum bottle. (Source photo by Linda Morland)
Intern Devonte Stevens displays a bottle he found while walking through the grounds. It is possibly an early rum bottle. (Source photo by Linda Morland)
Alicia Odewale studies a new piece of tile that was found on the grounds as William White, left, and Jeffery Miller look on. (Source photo by Linda Morland)
Alicia Odewale studies a new piece of tile that was found on the grounds as William White, left, and Jeffery Miller look on. (Source photo by Linda Morland)

An afternoon gave visitors a chance to look into the past, as the Society of Black Archaeologists held an open house of its multi-year, sustainable archaeology project at Estate Little Princess.

The Saturday event was held in conjunction with the Slave Wrecks Project, Crucian Heritage and Nature Tourism, and Archaeology in the Community.

The project included scholars, students, collaborators and volunteers from across the United States and St. Croix, and introduces Crucian youth to archaeology. It is focused on collecting and conserving artifacts associated with enslaved Africans so people can learn more about their lives and Crucian heritage.

The project introduces young Crucians to the field of archaeology and the basic concepts needed to conserve artifacts associated with both enslaved and free Afro Crucian families. According to Dr. Alexandra Jones, executive director of Archaeology in the Community, they have “a pipeline of students from middle school through graduate school.”

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Intern Armani Doward shows the bottom of the cabin wall. Coral blocks make up much of the building materials in the walls. These cabins were in use from the mid 1700s until the 1960s, giving a great opportunity to explore the living conditions over time. (Source photo by Linda Morland)
Intern Armani Doward shows the bottom of the cabin wall. Coral blocks make up much of the building materials in the walls. These cabins were in use from the mid 1700s until the 1960s, giving a great opportunity to explore the living conditions over time. (Source photo by Linda Morland)
Alicia Olewale, assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Tulsa, interprets one of the artifacts on display at Little Princess to Jeffrey Miller and Jennifer Miller. (Source photo by Linda Morland)
Alicia Olewale, assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Tulsa, interprets one of the artifacts on display at Little Princess to Jeffrey Miller and Jennifer Miller. (Source photo by Linda Morland)
Estate Little Princess was established in 1749. The original great house, shown here was later converted to a hospital. The estate was owned by the Friedrich von Moth, governor of St. Croix from Jan. 1, 1735, to May 15,1747. The estate was later divided and 18 acres were sold to Peter Von Scholten. (Source photo by Linda Morland)
Estate Little Princess was established in 1749. The original great house, shown here was later converted to a hospital. The estate was owned by the Friedrich von Moth, governor of St. Croix from Jan. 1, 1735, to May 15,1747. The estate was later divided and 18 acres were sold to Peter Von Scholten. (Source photo by Linda Morland)
William White of University of California, Berkley, points to clam shells in the pit. He is standing on what the archeologists believe may be a floor. (Source photo by Linda Morland)
William White of University of California, Berkley, points to clam shells in the pit. He is standing on what the archaeologists believe may be a floor. (Source photo by Linda Morland)
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