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Charlotte Amalie
Sunday, July 3, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesIsland Green, Come Again?

Island Green, Come Again?

Dear Source:
The R1 zone allows for up to 2 family dwellings maximum. Fifty parcels with two- family homes totals 100 homes. Once a home is submitted for within the zoning uses, the owner does not go through a major permit, it is a normal home building process that does not require public meetings. It is his/her legal right to submit a permit, one lot at a time. The scale of homes can range anything from eco-cottages to high-end homes. A homeowner has the right to sell each and every home they own.
If any developer comes into the Virgin Islands and finds themselves in a community that strongly objects to development, it behooves the developer to think of how to get around the obstacles. Bringing a full-scale development plan to such a community would not work. So what is the next step?
Get a stateside business license, don't register in the Virgin Islands. Why? Worst case scenario, one could easily think, maybe to keep under the radar with a name that is not recognizable? The next step would be to see what else would be a hurdle. In the case of our Cays, the next step would be to get access onto the cay, access large enough to withstand the materials that would be needed, and for home owners to use should full scale home building of parts or all parcels take place and then be rented, leased, or sold one by one.
How does one go about that? A developer applies for a single home permit then applies for a CZM major permit. Next step? A developer then tries to convince the community and CZM that the dock is only for one home despite the fact they own 95 acres. They also try to convince CZM and the community that because there is no other plans concreted yet, their application doesn't need to reflect "future developments" or environmental impact reports that would state what a full scale impact would be. It is only one cottage.
We are long past the days when a man's word is how business is done and anyone with Real Estate and Development backgrounds is more than aware of this. When it comes to Real Estate and Development contracts every "T" is cross and every "I" is dotted, so why would these same people think "their word" should suddenly be good enough by itself? Are they willing to back this up in legal form that no other development will take place and sign away their rights to any further development? I doubt it very much.
What happens when they get their dock, sell this property to another developer? That next developer if he/she too is only interested in "to the maximum" high end home building, can come in build 100 homes, sell them, make their fortune, damage the environment irreversibly, run property values sky high like what has happened to St. John and we the people pay the price.
Island Green, come again????

Carol Berry
St. Thomas

Editor's note: We welcome and encourage readers to keep the dialogue going by responding to Source commentary. Letters should be e-mailed with name and place of residence to source@viaccess.net.

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Dear Source:
The R1 zone allows for up to 2 family dwellings maximum. Fifty parcels with two- family homes totals 100 homes. Once a home is submitted for within the zoning uses, the owner does not go through a major permit, it is a normal home building process that does not require public meetings. It is his/her legal right to submit a permit, one lot at a time. The scale of homes can range anything from eco-cottages to high-end homes. A homeowner has the right to sell each and every home they own.
If any developer comes into the Virgin Islands and finds themselves in a community that strongly objects to development, it behooves the developer to think of how to get around the obstacles. Bringing a full-scale development plan to such a community would not work. So what is the next step?
Get a stateside business license, don't register in the Virgin Islands. Why? Worst case scenario, one could easily think, maybe to keep under the radar with a name that is not recognizable? The next step would be to see what else would be a hurdle. In the case of our Cays, the next step would be to get access onto the cay, access large enough to withstand the materials that would be needed, and for home owners to use should full scale home building of parts or all parcels take place and then be rented, leased, or sold one by one.
How does one go about that? A developer applies for a single home permit then applies for a CZM major permit. Next step? A developer then tries to convince the community and CZM that the dock is only for one home despite the fact they own 95 acres. They also try to convince CZM and the community that because there is no other plans concreted yet, their application doesn't need to reflect "future developments" or environmental impact reports that would state what a full scale impact would be. It is only one cottage.
We are long past the days when a man's word is how business is done and anyone with Real Estate and Development backgrounds is more than aware of this. When it comes to Real Estate and Development contracts every "T" is cross and every "I" is dotted, so why would these same people think "their word" should suddenly be good enough by itself? Are they willing to back this up in legal form that no other development will take place and sign away their rights to any further development? I doubt it very much.
What happens when they get their dock, sell this property to another developer? That next developer if he/she too is only interested in "to the maximum" high end home building, can come in build 100 homes, sell them, make their fortune, damage the environment irreversibly, run property values sky high like what has happened to St. John and we the people pay the price.
Island Green, come again????

Carol Berry
St. Thomas

Editor's note: We welcome and encourage readers to keep the dialogue going by responding to Source commentary. Letters should be e-mailed with name and place of residence to source@viaccess.net.