80.3 F
Charlotte Amalie
Thursday, August 18, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesWet, Windy Weather Expected Through Thursday

Wet, Windy Weather Expected Through Thursday

Sept. 25, 2007 — Experts predict gusty weather with thunderstorms starting later Tuesday night and continuing throughout Wednesday and into Thursday as a strong tropical wave passes through the area.
"But it doesn't show any signs of significant strengthening at the moment," said Robert Mitchell, a meteorologist at the National Weather Service in San Juan, Puerto Rico, at 5 p.m. Tuesday.
Upper-level wind shear across the Mona Passage will prevent development, he said. St. Croix was expected to start getting wind and rain around 8 p.m., with St. Thomas and St. John seeing a turn in the weather around midnight.
The system should start to leave the area by Thursday, with a big improvement by Thursday afternoon, Mitchell said. The Virgin Islands should get one to three inches of rain, as well as gusty winds.
Meanwhile, Tropical Storm Karen continues on its west-northwest track. As things currently stand, the track should keep it about 600 miles northeast of the Virgin Islands sometime Friday and Saturday, but Mitchell said the territory could get some rain from the outer bands.
"Things are subject to change," he said, noting that a small shift in direction could bring the storm closer to the territory.
Karen developed late Monday out of Tropical Depression 12. By Tuesday morning, the depression grew to a tropical storm. Computer models predict a strong tropical storm with winds of 65 to 70 mph, Mitchell said.
As of 5 p.m. Tuesday, the storm was centered at 11.1 degrees north latitude and 39.9 degrees west longitude, or about 1,430 miles east of the Windward Islands. Winds were at 40 mph with gusts to 50 mph. The barometric pressure stood at 1,005 millibars, or 29.67 inches. It was moving to the west-northwest at 14 mph.
Tropical storm force winds extended outward 45 miles.
Back Talk Share your reaction to this news with other Source readers. Please include headline, your name and city and state/country or island where you reside.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Keeping our community informed is our top priority.
If you have a news tip to share, please call or text us at 340-228-8784.




Support local + independent journalism in the U.S. Virgin Islands

Unlike many news organizations, we haven't put up a paywall – we want to keep our journalism as accessible as we can. Our independent journalism costs time, money and hard work to keep you informed, but we do it because we believe that it matters. We know that informed communities are empowered ones. If you appreciate our reporting and want to help make our future more secure, please consider donating.

FROM FACEBOOK

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
Load more
Sept. 25, 2007 -- Experts predict gusty weather with thunderstorms starting later Tuesday night and continuing throughout Wednesday and into Thursday as a strong tropical wave passes through the area.
"But it doesn't show any signs of significant strengthening at the moment," said Robert Mitchell, a meteorologist at the National Weather Service in San Juan, Puerto Rico, at 5 p.m. Tuesday.
Upper-level wind shear across the Mona Passage will prevent development, he said. St. Croix was expected to start getting wind and rain around 8 p.m., with St. Thomas and St. John seeing a turn in the weather around midnight.
The system should start to leave the area by Thursday, with a big improvement by Thursday afternoon, Mitchell said. The Virgin Islands should get one to three inches of rain, as well as gusty winds.
Meanwhile, Tropical Storm Karen continues on its west-northwest track. As things currently stand, the track should keep it about 600 miles northeast of the Virgin Islands sometime Friday and Saturday, but Mitchell said the territory could get some rain from the outer bands.
"Things are subject to change," he said, noting that a small shift in direction could bring the storm closer to the territory.
Karen developed late Monday out of Tropical Depression 12. By Tuesday morning, the depression grew to a tropical storm. Computer models predict a strong tropical storm with winds of 65 to 70 mph, Mitchell said.
As of 5 p.m. Tuesday, the storm was centered at 11.1 degrees north latitude and 39.9 degrees west longitude, or about 1,430 miles east of the Windward Islands. Winds were at 40 mph with gusts to 50 mph. The barometric pressure stood at 1,005 millibars, or 29.67 inches. It was moving to the west-northwest at 14 mph.
Tropical storm force winds extended outward 45 miles.
Back Talk Share your reaction to this news with other Source readers. Please include headline, your name and city and state/country or island where you reside.