87.5 F
Charlotte Amalie
Thursday, August 11, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesDeJongh, Other Governors Meet with President Bush at the White House

DeJongh, Other Governors Meet with President Bush at the White House

Feb. 26, 2007 — Gov. John P. deJongh's third day of participation in the Winter Meeting of the National Governor's Association featured a three-hour working session with President George W. Bush and members of his administration on issues ranging from the war's impact on local National Guard units to the reauthorization of several components of the federal "No Child Left Behind Act."
The nation's governors returned to the White House Monday following a Sunday-night dinner with the president and first lady. The meeting Monday included briefings by the Joint Chiefs of Staff and Gen. Pete Pace, who provided an update on the war in Iraq and the levels required for manning the war. The discussion also shifted to an open dialogue about the impact the war is having on state and territorial National Guard troops.
Interior Secretary Dirk Kempthorne addressed the scope of his agency's work and the willingness of that department to be of assistance, especially to the territories of the United States for which it has direct oversight. Both Health and Human Services Secretary Michael Leavitt and Budget Director Rob Portman addressed what deJongh said may become a significant issue, the funding of and accessibility to state children's health-insurance programs.
There was also a discussion on the president's plan to provide health-insurance coverage to all. Education Secretary Margaret Spellings spent much time at the meeting providing an overview on the provisions of the "No Child Left Behind Act," which now requires re-authorization.
DeJongh said Monday the meeting provided "an opportunity for all governors to be updated on key challenges now facing the country. Some of these issues may trickle down to the territorial government's level."
Following the meeting at the White House, deJongh returned to the JW Marriott, where the four-day conference is being staged, to take part in forums which focused on issues of economic development and commerce, education, early childhood and workforce, health and human services and natural resources.
Sunday's meetings were geared towards education and specifically, strategies for improving student achievement in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education. There were also discussions on means by which U.S. jurisdictions can promote innovation-based economic development.
The mid-afternoon session attended by the nation's chief executives highlighted the importance of STEM in creating an innovation environment across the nation.
James H. Simons, founder and chair of Math for America and president of Renaissance Technologies, delivered the keynote address, focusing on the importance of improving student achievement in math. In addition, a panel of educators representing the different facets of STEM education addressed the governors. They included Dean Kamen, inventor, entrepreneur and advocate for science and technology; Mary Ann Rankin, dean of the College of Natural Sciences at the University of Texas; and William H. Schmidt, university distinguished professor at Michigan State University. Noted communications consultant Frank Luntz spoke of effective ways to communicate about innovation.
The Winter Meeting of the NGA will wrap up Tuesday morning with an open session featuring an address by Sen. Lamar Alexander of Tennessee, who will speak about the federal role in innovation and competitiveness. DeJongh then embarks on a series of meeting over several days with congressional leaders and representatives of the White House.
Back Talk Share your reaction to this news with other Source readers. Please include headline, your name and city and state/country or island where you reside.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Keeping our community informed is our top priority.
If you have a news tip to share, please call or text us at 340-228-8784.




Support local + independent journalism in the U.S. Virgin Islands

Unlike many news organizations, we haven't put up a paywall – we want to keep our journalism as accessible as we can. Our independent journalism costs time, money and hard work to keep you informed, but we do it because we believe that it matters. We know that informed communities are empowered ones. If you appreciate our reporting and want to help make our future more secure, please consider donating.

FROM FACEBOOK

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
Load more
Feb. 26, 2007 -- Gov. John P. deJongh's third day of participation in the Winter Meeting of the National Governor's Association featured a three-hour working session with President George W. Bush and members of his administration on issues ranging from the war's impact on local National Guard units to the reauthorization of several components of the federal "No Child Left Behind Act."
The nation's governors returned to the White House Monday following a Sunday-night dinner with the president and first lady. The meeting Monday included briefings by the Joint Chiefs of Staff and Gen. Pete Pace, who provided an update on the war in Iraq and the levels required for manning the war. The discussion also shifted to an open dialogue about the impact the war is having on state and territorial National Guard troops.
Interior Secretary Dirk Kempthorne addressed the scope of his agency's work and the willingness of that department to be of assistance, especially to the territories of the United States for which it has direct oversight. Both Health and Human Services Secretary Michael Leavitt and Budget Director Rob Portman addressed what deJongh said may become a significant issue, the funding of and accessibility to state children's health-insurance programs.
There was also a discussion on the president's plan to provide health-insurance coverage to all. Education Secretary Margaret Spellings spent much time at the meeting providing an overview on the provisions of the "No Child Left Behind Act," which now requires re-authorization.
DeJongh said Monday the meeting provided "an opportunity for all governors to be updated on key challenges now facing the country. Some of these issues may trickle down to the territorial government's level."
Following the meeting at the White House, deJongh returned to the JW Marriott, where the four-day conference is being staged, to take part in forums which focused on issues of economic development and commerce, education, early childhood and workforce, health and human services and natural resources.
Sunday's meetings were geared towards education and specifically, strategies for improving student achievement in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education. There were also discussions on means by which U.S. jurisdictions can promote innovation-based economic development.
The mid-afternoon session attended by the nation's chief executives highlighted the importance of STEM in creating an innovation environment across the nation.
James H. Simons, founder and chair of Math for America and president of Renaissance Technologies, delivered the keynote address, focusing on the importance of improving student achievement in math. In addition, a panel of educators representing the different facets of STEM education addressed the governors. They included Dean Kamen, inventor, entrepreneur and advocate for science and technology; Mary Ann Rankin, dean of the College of Natural Sciences at the University of Texas; and William H. Schmidt, university distinguished professor at Michigan State University. Noted communications consultant Frank Luntz spoke of effective ways to communicate about innovation.
The Winter Meeting of the NGA will wrap up Tuesday morning with an open session featuring an address by Sen. Lamar Alexander of Tennessee, who will speak about the federal role in innovation and competitiveness. DeJongh then embarks on a series of meeting over several days with congressional leaders and representatives of the White House.
Back Talk Share your reaction to this news with other Source readers. Please include headline, your name and city and state/country or island where you reside.