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Charlotte Amalie
Tuesday, June 28, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesASK NOT WHAT YOUR TERRITORY CAN SPEND FOR YOU

ASK NOT WHAT YOUR TERRITORY CAN SPEND FOR YOU

Dear Source:
It comes a surprise to me that so many writers of letters and opinion pieces in the Source do not understand the primary purpose of the U.S. Virgin Islands. Typical of this lack of understanding are the critical comments about the expenditure of a paltry $700,000 Web site to promote tourism. Those who are inclined to criticize this donation should pause to reflect on the aid this provides to IBM, Ogilvy & Mather, and any others fortunate enough to share in this generous contribution. They must learn that the affluent Virgin Islands has a moral duty to support the financially strapped United States. They must learn to, "Ask not, 'What my country can do for me,' but to ask, 'What can my territory do for my country.'"
Many years ago, as a reporter and editor for the Daily Nuisance, I realized that the U.S. did not buy the islands from Denmark during World War I to keep the German fleet from using Coral Bay as a base, but to acquire a steady source of income from a grateful territorial government. History has proved that a wise decision. Where else would all those contractors, consultants, entrepreneurs, and tax dodgers, who have over the decades found gold in the islands, be able to satisfy their financial needs?
Quibble not at a mere three-quarters of a mil' for a Web site. Be proud of your island's generosity in donating 10 or 20 times more than the cheapskate companies I know would contribute for a Web site.
Ask not what the Web site might cost, ask what can be given. If you authorize the check, you may receive your reward on Earth and not in Heaven.
John Thompson

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Dear Source:
It comes a surprise to me that so many writers of letters and opinion pieces in the Source do not understand the primary purpose of the U.S. Virgin Islands. Typical of this lack of understanding are the critical comments about the expenditure of a paltry $700,000 Web site to promote tourism. Those who are inclined to criticize this donation should pause to reflect on the aid this provides to IBM, Ogilvy & Mather, and any others fortunate enough to share in this generous contribution. They must learn that the affluent Virgin Islands has a moral duty to support the financially strapped United States. They must learn to, "Ask not, 'What my country can do for me,' but to ask, 'What can my territory do for my country.'"
Many years ago, as a reporter and editor for the Daily Nuisance, I realized that the U.S. did not buy the islands from Denmark during World War I to keep the German fleet from using Coral Bay as a base, but to acquire a steady source of income from a grateful territorial government. History has proved that a wise decision. Where else would all those contractors, consultants, entrepreneurs, and tax dodgers, who have over the decades found gold in the islands, be able to satisfy their financial needs?
Quibble not at a mere three-quarters of a mil' for a Web site. Be proud of your island's generosity in donating 10 or 20 times more than the cheapskate companies I know would contribute for a Web site.
Ask not what the Web site might cost, ask what can be given. If you authorize the check, you may receive your reward on Earth and not in Heaven.
John Thompson