82.1 F
Charlotte Amalie
Monday, August 8, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesEx-Hospital CEO Gets No Jail Time For Falsifying Documents

Ex-Hospital CEO Gets No Jail Time For Falsifying Documents

May 5, 2009 — Judge Leon H. Kendall Tuesday sentenced Rodney E. Miller Sr., convicted by a jury of falsifying his criminal history to snag the top job at Schneider Regional Medical Center, to a year's probation, community service, and fined him $500.
In his pre-sentencing statement, Miller, who pulled down $265,000 a year as president and chief executive officer of SRMC and is charged with embezzling more, said that God brought him here to serve the people of the Virgin Islands.
"It was my God-given mission — that is why I was given the job over others," Miller said.
Prosecuting attorney Denise George-Counts had recommended that Miller face the maximum two years of jail time, citing a lack of remorse on Miller's part and statements that she said were less than forthright on his pre-sentencing paperwork.
Integrity was a prime consideration for the hospital's top position, George-Counts said, and Miller's false statements on the application gave the selection committee a false impression as to his character.
Kendall disagreed. "The public interest is not served in this case by incarcerating Mr. Miller," Kendall said, noting that though Miller may have falsified the application, once he got the appointment, he made significant strides for health care in the territory.
Miller took credit for improving morale at the hospital, while facilitating its accreditation, and improvements in cardio-medicine capabilities.
"No ordinary person could have come in and made that happen," Miller said.
Miller was convicted February 9 of lying about his criminal record, which included a court-martial, to get the job at the hospital. (See: "Jury Convicts Miller of Lying.")
Miller's career in the U.S. Navy, where he reached the rank of E4 and was busted to E1, ended in 2000 with a bad conduct discharge according to George-Counts.
Kendall noted that other matters pending before the court may have prevented Miller from making full statements on the pre-sentencing paperwork.
Miller will be back in court June 8 with two former hospital executives and former hospital board chair June A. Adams, to stand trial on embezzlement, grand larceny and conspiracy charges.
Back Talk

Share your reaction to this news with other Source readers. Please include headline, your name and city and state/country or island where you reside.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Keeping our community informed is our top priority.
If you have a news tip to share, please call or text us at 340-228-8784.




Support local + independent journalism in the U.S. Virgin Islands

Unlike many news organizations, we haven't put up a paywall – we want to keep our journalism as accessible as we can. Our independent journalism costs time, money and hard work to keep you informed, but we do it because we believe that it matters. We know that informed communities are empowered ones. If you appreciate our reporting and want to help make our future more secure, please consider donating.

FROM FACEBOOK

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
Load more
May 5, 2009 -- Judge Leon H. Kendall Tuesday sentenced Rodney E. Miller Sr., convicted by a jury of falsifying his criminal history to snag the top job at Schneider Regional Medical Center, to a year's probation, community service, and fined him $500.
In his pre-sentencing statement, Miller, who pulled down $265,000 a year as president and chief executive officer of SRMC and is charged with embezzling more, said that God brought him here to serve the people of the Virgin Islands.
"It was my God-given mission -- that is why I was given the job over others," Miller said.
Prosecuting attorney Denise George-Counts had recommended that Miller face the maximum two years of jail time, citing a lack of remorse on Miller's part and statements that she said were less than forthright on his pre-sentencing paperwork.
Integrity was a prime consideration for the hospital's top position, George-Counts said, and Miller's false statements on the application gave the selection committee a false impression as to his character.
Kendall disagreed. "The public interest is not served in this case by incarcerating Mr. Miller," Kendall said, noting that though Miller may have falsified the application, once he got the appointment, he made significant strides for health care in the territory.
Miller took credit for improving morale at the hospital, while facilitating its accreditation, and improvements in cardio-medicine capabilities.
"No ordinary person could have come in and made that happen," Miller said.
Miller was convicted February 9 of lying about his criminal record, which included a court-martial, to get the job at the hospital. (See: "Jury Convicts Miller of Lying.")
Miller's career in the U.S. Navy, where he reached the rank of E4 and was busted to E1, ended in 2000 with a bad conduct discharge according to George-Counts.
Kendall noted that other matters pending before the court may have prevented Miller from making full statements on the pre-sentencing paperwork.
Miller will be back in court June 8 with two former hospital executives and former hospital board chair June A. Adams, to stand trial on embezzlement, grand larceny and conspiracy charges.
Back Talk


Share your reaction to this news with other Source readers. Please include headline, your name and city and state/country or island where you reside.