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HomeNewsArchivesPlanning Alerts St. John Boaters to Changes in Coral Bay

Planning Alerts St. John Boaters to Changes in Coral Bay

March 2, 2009 — More than 100 people overflowed the bleachers at the Coral Bay basketball court Monday to hear from the Planning and Natural Resources Department about the changes afoot in Coral Bay harbor.
Planning held a similar meeting Feb. 26 at Skinny Legs Bar and Restaurant after officers from the department arrived unannounced to bring order to the bay.
"We're here to make this transition as easy as possible," said Acting Enforcement Director Roberto Tapia.
Complaints that he and his officers arrived in Coral Bay with a "heavy hand" were unfounded, he said, because all they did was enforce the 1992 Mooring and Anchoring law. Once he gets the harbor in shape, Tapia said, his officers will make periodic visits to make sure it stays that way.
After one boater complained that Planning dropped the ball because it failed to hold additional meetings of a harbor committee after one on Nov. 20, 2005, Tapia told them it was up to the boaters to schedule meetings. The committee formed after a previous effort at bringing boaters in compliance with the law.
At issue is the fact that a number of boats in Coral Bay were unregistered.
"I had people come in to register boats that hadn't been registered in five years," Tapia said.
In one case, he said, a woman rented a boat that hadn't been registered in three years.
One boater asked what he should do about his situation. He bought a boat that hadn't been registered for six years by the previous owners. When he went to register it, Planning staff couldn't find the documentation.
"I hope you find the paperwork, because you're going to pay the arrears for six years," Tapia said.
Coral Bay has a dozen boats sunk in various locations, he said. Planning will bring in a towing company to remove them.
Tapia warned boaters that by 2011 they must get a receipt from a pump-out station when they pump out or go three miles out to sea to dump their holding tanks. If boaters are heading three miles out, they must notify Planning so an officer can witness their departure. If they don't comply, they won't be able to register their boats in 2012.
He had harsh words for boaters not using their holding tanks.
"Do not let me come on your boat and see it going straight to the sea," Tapia said.
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March 2, 2009 -- More than 100 people overflowed the bleachers at the Coral Bay basketball court Monday to hear from the Planning and Natural Resources Department about the changes afoot in Coral Bay harbor.
Planning held a similar meeting Feb. 26 at Skinny Legs Bar and Restaurant after officers from the department arrived unannounced to bring order to the bay.
"We're here to make this transition as easy as possible," said Acting Enforcement Director Roberto Tapia.
Complaints that he and his officers arrived in Coral Bay with a "heavy hand" were unfounded, he said, because all they did was enforce the 1992 Mooring and Anchoring law. Once he gets the harbor in shape, Tapia said, his officers will make periodic visits to make sure it stays that way.
After one boater complained that Planning dropped the ball because it failed to hold additional meetings of a harbor committee after one on Nov. 20, 2005, Tapia told them it was up to the boaters to schedule meetings. The committee formed after a previous effort at bringing boaters in compliance with the law.
At issue is the fact that a number of boats in Coral Bay were unregistered.
"I had people come in to register boats that hadn't been registered in five years," Tapia said.
In one case, he said, a woman rented a boat that hadn't been registered in three years.
One boater asked what he should do about his situation. He bought a boat that hadn't been registered for six years by the previous owners. When he went to register it, Planning staff couldn't find the documentation.
"I hope you find the paperwork, because you're going to pay the arrears for six years," Tapia said.
Coral Bay has a dozen boats sunk in various locations, he said. Planning will bring in a towing company to remove them.
Tapia warned boaters that by 2011 they must get a receipt from a pump-out station when they pump out or go three miles out to sea to dump their holding tanks. If boaters are heading three miles out, they must notify Planning so an officer can witness their departure. If they don't comply, they won't be able to register their boats in 2012.
He had harsh words for boaters not using their holding tanks.
"Do not let me come on your boat and see it going straight to the sea," Tapia said.
Back Talk Share your reaction to this news with other Source readers. Please include headline, your name and city and state/country or island where you reside.