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Dirty Dogs Come Clean For A Good Cause

Sept 6, 2008 — The scent of dog shampoo and clean canines wafted through the air Saturday at Chenay Bay Beach Resort where the St. Croix Animal Welfare Center hosted an East End Doggie Wash.
For $15 each, 90 dogs had baths, nails trimmed and ears cleaned at the first doggie wash held on the east end. Two doggie washes have been done on the west side of St. Croix and one is planned on Nov. 8 in Frederiksted at Coconuts Restaurant.
The mission of the center, located in Cliffton Hill, is to promote the humane treatment of animals through animal control, humane education, low cost spay and neutering and adoption of animals on island and stateside.
"This is a great community outreach that is a lot of fun and educational, where people learn about grooming," said Stacia Boswell, executive director and veterinarian at the center. "The doggie washes have been so successful we will do four each year."
Volunteers stood in three blue plastic wading pools washing dogs of all sizes and breeds.
Boswell said some of the dogs really needed to have their nails trimmed.
"Some people don't know how to trim nails or they're afraid to trim them," Boswell said.
For a fee of $25, Boswell surgically implanted a microchip on the back of a dog's neck; the number on the chip is logged and registered nationally.
"Even if the dog is lost in Europe it can be scanned and returned to its owner," Boswell said.
Gretchen Sherrill, communications director for the center, said the staff at Chenay Bay Beach Resort was really helpful in organizing the doggie wash.
"It was a great collaborative effort with them allowing us to set up in a nice pet-friendly environment," Sherrill said. "They even let the dogs on the beach."
Sherrill said the event was more of a "friend-raiser" but they did take in $1,600 for their efforts. They also sold animal welfare center T-shirts and ball caps for $5. The price for the doggie wash was $15.
"This was a lot of fun and a great chance for the dogs to see other dogs," said dog owner, Fritz Rahr. "And it was all for a good cause."
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Sept 6, 2008 -- The scent of dog shampoo and clean canines wafted through the air Saturday at Chenay Bay Beach Resort where the St. Croix Animal Welfare Center hosted an East End Doggie Wash.
For $15 each, 90 dogs had baths, nails trimmed and ears cleaned at the first doggie wash held on the east end. Two doggie washes have been done on the west side of St. Croix and one is planned on Nov. 8 in Frederiksted at Coconuts Restaurant.
The mission of the center, located in Cliffton Hill, is to promote the humane treatment of animals through animal control, humane education, low cost spay and neutering and adoption of animals on island and stateside.
"This is a great community outreach that is a lot of fun and educational, where people learn about grooming," said Stacia Boswell, executive director and veterinarian at the center. "The doggie washes have been so successful we will do four each year."
Volunteers stood in three blue plastic wading pools washing dogs of all sizes and breeds.
Boswell said some of the dogs really needed to have their nails trimmed.
"Some people don't know how to trim nails or they're afraid to trim them," Boswell said.
For a fee of $25, Boswell surgically implanted a microchip on the back of a dog's neck; the number on the chip is logged and registered nationally.
"Even if the dog is lost in Europe it can be scanned and returned to its owner," Boswell said.
Gretchen Sherrill, communications director for the center, said the staff at Chenay Bay Beach Resort was really helpful in organizing the doggie wash.
"It was a great collaborative effort with them allowing us to set up in a nice pet-friendly environment," Sherrill said. "They even let the dogs on the beach."
Sherrill said the event was more of a "friend-raiser" but they did take in $1,600 for their efforts. They also sold animal welfare center T-shirts and ball caps for $5. The price for the doggie wash was $15.
"This was a lot of fun and a great chance for the dogs to see other dogs," said dog owner, Fritz Rahr. "And it was all for a good cause."
Back Talk


Share your reaction to this news with other Source readers. Please include headline, your name and city and state/country or island where you reside.