82.1 F
Charlotte Amalie
Tuesday, August 9, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesRobots and Synchronized Colors Close Out STEM Program

Robots and Synchronized Colors Close Out STEM Program

July 1, 2008 — On Tuesday 20 of the brightest computer enthusiasts in 6th through 10th grades showed friends and family what they had accomplished in a two-week workshop using NetLOGO, software that develops complex models to simulate scientific research.
The students were enrolled in the Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) summer program at the University of the Virgin Islands. Participants learned to create models using NetLOGO and build robots guided by remote control.
At the closing ceremony in the Evans Center on the St. Croix campus before approximately 100 people, the students gave presentations and demonstrations on the models they created.
"This workshop has taught me to be patient," Kyanna Christian said. "And to work together as a team."
The students from private and public schools each had a partner. The pairs gave physical demonstrations and detailed, step-by-step PowerPoint presentations on NetLOGO models they created.
Some of the animated models created were elaborate designs with synchronized colors, patterns and music. Two boys had created an animated beach scene in bright primary colors with the sound of waves in the background. They showed how they were able to get in and choose very specific colors. One pair was into techno music and focused mostly on the techno sounds, with musical notes in color. The students even created popular musical selections broadcast from their robots.
The students all worked collaboratively to create a game they called "Maniac Monkey."
"I want to become a game designer," Cylton Grouby said. "I learned a lot in this challenging workshop."
The robots were created with the intention of performing a simulated excavation on Mars.
"Seeing what robots can really do on Mars was something I learned here in the workshop," said Gabriell Ramos, a student at Free Will Baptist School. "The robots were fun to make, too."
Robotic vehicles resembling mini Hummers were made with yellow, white and black Legos. At the front of the theater on an eight-foot table with a green paper surface, students demonstrated sample retrieval, maneuvering an obstacle course and performing 90-degree turns using remote controls. Velma Tyson, UVI professor, was the robotics instructor.
The STEM program began in 2005 through a partnership with the university and the St. Croix Foundation. From the beginning, the foundation provided most of the funding for the program through its math and science scholarship fund, while a grant from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provided partial funding for the equipment used during the programs.
This year STEM got a boost from Harvey Clap, owner of Marmarus Management. He told Roger Dewey, executive director of the St. Croix Foundation, he was looking for a project where he could help make a difference. Dewey suggested STEM, and Clap picked up the bill for 14 new laptops, lunch and the salary for teachers and assistants.
"This program teaches children a wonderful use of computers," Clap said.
The St. Croix Women's Initiative sponsored four sixth graders.
"We had a lot of great talent showcased," said Michelle Peterson, UVI science coordinator and NetLOGO instructor. "And they were a great group of students to work with."
Students participating were Bruce Kelly, Brandon Balwant, Kareem Edwards, Reuben James, Kyanna Christian, Nickya Francois, Genna Keller, Orchydia Sukey, Gabriel Ramos, Kijon Washington, Rashid Iles, Shelby Fleming, Denisha Emmanuel, Shallum Alfred, Anisha Thomas, Kemisha Browne, Tristan Powell, Cylton Grouby, Kernita Thomas and O'Neil Canton.
"I can say they all came away from the workshop with a lot of knowledge," Peterson said.
For more information about STEM or the St. Croix Foundation, call 773-9898.
Back Talk Share your reaction to this news with other Source readers. Please include headline, your name and city and state/country or island where you reside.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Keeping our community informed is our top priority.
If you have a news tip to share, please call or text us at 340-228-8784.




Support local + independent journalism in the U.S. Virgin Islands

Unlike many news organizations, we haven't put up a paywall – we want to keep our journalism as accessible as we can. Our independent journalism costs time, money and hard work to keep you informed, but we do it because we believe that it matters. We know that informed communities are empowered ones. If you appreciate our reporting and want to help make our future more secure, please consider donating.

FROM FACEBOOK

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
Load more
July 1, 2008 -- On Tuesday 20 of the brightest computer enthusiasts in 6th through 10th grades showed friends and family what they had accomplished in a two-week workshop using NetLOGO, software that develops complex models to simulate scientific research.
The students were enrolled in the Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) summer program at the University of the Virgin Islands. Participants learned to create models using NetLOGO and build robots guided by remote control.
At the closing ceremony in the Evans Center on the St. Croix campus before approximately 100 people, the students gave presentations and demonstrations on the models they created.
"This workshop has taught me to be patient," Kyanna Christian said. "And to work together as a team."
The students from private and public schools each had a partner. The pairs gave physical demonstrations and detailed, step-by-step PowerPoint presentations on NetLOGO models they created.
Some of the animated models created were elaborate designs with synchronized colors, patterns and music. Two boys had created an animated beach scene in bright primary colors with the sound of waves in the background. They showed how they were able to get in and choose very specific colors. One pair was into techno music and focused mostly on the techno sounds, with musical notes in color. The students even created popular musical selections broadcast from their robots.
The students all worked collaboratively to create a game they called "Maniac Monkey."
"I want to become a game designer," Cylton Grouby said. "I learned a lot in this challenging workshop."
The robots were created with the intention of performing a simulated excavation on Mars.
"Seeing what robots can really do on Mars was something I learned here in the workshop," said Gabriell Ramos, a student at Free Will Baptist School. "The robots were fun to make, too."
Robotic vehicles resembling mini Hummers were made with yellow, white and black Legos. At the front of the theater on an eight-foot table with a green paper surface, students demonstrated sample retrieval, maneuvering an obstacle course and performing 90-degree turns using remote controls. Velma Tyson, UVI professor, was the robotics instructor.
The STEM program began in 2005 through a partnership with the university and the St. Croix Foundation. From the beginning, the foundation provided most of the funding for the program through its math and science scholarship fund, while a grant from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provided partial funding for the equipment used during the programs.
This year STEM got a boost from Harvey Clap, owner of Marmarus Management. He told Roger Dewey, executive director of the St. Croix Foundation, he was looking for a project where he could help make a difference. Dewey suggested STEM, and Clap picked up the bill for 14 new laptops, lunch and the salary for teachers and assistants.
"This program teaches children a wonderful use of computers," Clap said.
The St. Croix Women's Initiative sponsored four sixth graders.
"We had a lot of great talent showcased," said Michelle Peterson, UVI science coordinator and NetLOGO instructor. "And they were a great group of students to work with."
Students participating were Bruce Kelly, Brandon Balwant, Kareem Edwards, Reuben James, Kyanna Christian, Nickya Francois, Genna Keller, Orchydia Sukey, Gabriel Ramos, Kijon Washington, Rashid Iles, Shelby Fleming, Denisha Emmanuel, Shallum Alfred, Anisha Thomas, Kemisha Browne, Tristan Powell, Cylton Grouby, Kernita Thomas and O'Neil Canton.
"I can say they all came away from the workshop with a lot of knowledge," Peterson said.
For more information about STEM or the St. Croix Foundation, call 773-9898.
Back Talk Share your reaction to this news with other Source readers. Please include headline, your name and city and state/country or island where you reside.