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Joy and Sorrow Converge for Carnival Village Dedication

April 21, 2008 — Amidst all the joy of the Carnival season, heavy hearts gathered at the Fort Christian parking lot Monday evening to dedicate this year's Carnival Village, called "TJ's Place," to the memory of the late Trevor "TJ" Joseph.
Joseph was killed last July after servicing an automated teller machine outside the lobby of the Best Western Emerald Beach Hotel near the Cyril King Airport. (See "ATM Company Offering $10,000 Reward in Joseph Murder.")
Joseph's wife, Gail, was on hand Monday for the opening ceremonies, accompanied by Joseph's daughters, Wistaria, 40, and Takia, 9. The ceremony was clearly an emotional one for the family, as the trio held on to each other and cried while other speakers recalled Joseph's continuous involvement with the V.I. Carnival Committee and his dedicated service as a V.I. National Guardsman.
"To see that this dedication is being made in my father's honor is truly awesome," Wistaria said later in the evening. "And we thank the V.I. community, the V.I. Carnival Committee and the Village Committee for embracing the love and passion my father has always displayed for Carnival music and having a good time."
Family friend Jean Greaux Jr. also recalled Joseph's "unwavering support" for annual Carnival festivities.
"Trevor was Carnival and Carnival was Trevor," said Greaux, the Government House communications director. "TJ was in every corner of this village, every night, every year. And I know that his spirit is still here, alive and well."
For the first time local booth owners will be able to use potable water lines set up in "half a dozen strategic places" around the Village, Greaux noted.
While other officials shared their own memories of Joseph and paid tribute to other local heroes such as Sgt. First Class Floyd Lake, who died last year in a helicopter crash over Iraq, Gov. John deJongh Jr. reflected on the general spirit of Carnival.
"It's about community," deJongh said. "The chance for this community to come together, have fun and party, but to be respectful. And I believe we've showed all that tonight by dedicating this village in the memory of Trevor Joseph."
DeJongh also urged the community to turn out at other Carnival events — particularly Friday's Children's Parade.
"Each year we say that the children are our future," deJongh said. "But we have to let them know that they are also our present. Let them know this Friday, by coming out to the parade, what they mean to us."
Other officials speaking during the event were Delegate Donna M. Christensen, Senate President Usie Richards and Lt. Gov. Gregory R. Francis. The ceremonies also opened and closed with performances by the 73rd V.I. National Guard Band.
Wrapping up the festivities was the announcement of this year's booth winners:
— Overall winner: Booth No. 14: The Last Stop, owned by Rosalind Titley, who also won an award for having her booth "best reflect" this year's Carnival theme;
— First runner up: Booth No. 11: Top Secret, owned by Mark Gottlieb, and serving dishes including stewed whelks, chicken and conch; and
— Second runner up: Booth No. 19: Tings Brown: Pay as You Go, owned by Omar Brown III, Raymond Brown and Keon Smith, adding to the mix with dishes such as fish soup, stewed mutton and other seafood dishes.
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April 21, 2008 -- Amidst all the joy of the Carnival season, heavy hearts gathered at the Fort Christian parking lot Monday evening to dedicate this year's Carnival Village, called "TJ's Place," to the memory of the late Trevor "TJ" Joseph.
Joseph was killed last July after servicing an automated teller machine outside the lobby of the Best Western Emerald Beach Hotel near the Cyril King Airport. (See "ATM Company Offering $10,000 Reward in Joseph Murder.")
Joseph's wife, Gail, was on hand Monday for the opening ceremonies, accompanied by Joseph's daughters, Wistaria, 40, and Takia, 9. The ceremony was clearly an emotional one for the family, as the trio held on to each other and cried while other speakers recalled Joseph's continuous involvement with the V.I. Carnival Committee and his dedicated service as a V.I. National Guardsman.
"To see that this dedication is being made in my father's honor is truly awesome," Wistaria said later in the evening. "And we thank the V.I. community, the V.I. Carnival Committee and the Village Committee for embracing the love and passion my father has always displayed for Carnival music and having a good time."
Family friend Jean Greaux Jr. also recalled Joseph's "unwavering support" for annual Carnival festivities.
"Trevor was Carnival and Carnival was Trevor," said Greaux, the Government House communications director. "TJ was in every corner of this village, every night, every year. And I know that his spirit is still here, alive and well."
For the first time local booth owners will be able to use potable water lines set up in "half a dozen strategic places" around the Village, Greaux noted.
While other officials shared their own memories of Joseph and paid tribute to other local heroes such as Sgt. First Class Floyd Lake, who died last year in a helicopter crash over Iraq, Gov. John deJongh Jr. reflected on the general spirit of Carnival.
"It's about community," deJongh said. "The chance for this community to come together, have fun and party, but to be respectful. And I believe we've showed all that tonight by dedicating this village in the memory of Trevor Joseph."
DeJongh also urged the community to turn out at other Carnival events -- particularly Friday's Children's Parade.
"Each year we say that the children are our future," deJongh said. "But we have to let them know that they are also our present. Let them know this Friday, by coming out to the parade, what they mean to us."
Other officials speaking during the event were Delegate Donna M. Christensen, Senate President Usie Richards and Lt. Gov. Gregory R. Francis. The ceremonies also opened and closed with performances by the 73rd V.I. National Guard Band.
Wrapping up the festivities was the announcement of this year's booth winners:
-- Overall winner: Booth No. 14: The Last Stop, owned by Rosalind Titley, who also won an award for having her booth "best reflect" this year's Carnival theme;
-- First runner up: Booth No. 11: Top Secret, owned by Mark Gottlieb, and serving dishes including stewed whelks, chicken and conch; and
-- Second runner up: Booth No. 19: Tings Brown: Pay as You Go, owned by Omar Brown III, Raymond Brown and Keon Smith, adding to the mix with dishes such as fish soup, stewed mutton and other seafood dishes.
Back Talk Share your reaction to this news with other Source readers. Please include headline, your name and city and state/country or island where you reside.