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HomeNewsArchivesTerritory Will Get $2.8 Million in Federal Funds for Wastewater Treatment

Territory Will Get $2.8 Million in Federal Funds for Wastewater Treatment

June 29, 2007 — The territory stands to get $2.8 million for improvements to the territory's wastewater systems thanks to an appropriation Wednesday by the U.S. House of Representatives.
The appropriation was included in the 2008 Interior and Environmental Appropriations bill that includes funding for environmental and conservation programs, said Delegate Donna M. Christensen in a news release issued Thursday.
The money will go for improvements to the territory's wastewater infrastructure, said V.I. Waste Management Authority spokeswoman Stella Saunders. The territory received money under this grant for the last five years, including $3.2 million in 2007, she said.
In 2006, the number stood at $4.6 million, plus $1 million in supplemental funds for the LBJ main sewer line and $235,000 for scrap-tire management. Funding stood at $4.2 million in 2005, $5 million in 2004 and $5.4 million in 2003.
The bill must first pass muster with the U.S. Senate before getting signed into law by President Bush, said Christensen aide Brian Modeste on Friday.
"It's not likely that the environmental provisions would cause him to veto it," Modeste said.
The environmental provisions were added by House Democrats to Bush's budget bill. If Bush were to veto the bill, it would only be because the dollar amount exceeded what he wanted to spend, Modeste said. A veto by Bush might hurt other Republicans, he said.
The territory will receive the money after the start of the fiscal year on Oct. 1, Modeste said.
Programs covered by the appropriations include the Clean Water State Revolving Fund, which supports projects that improve drinking water in communities across the country. Additionally, money will go to pay for sewer and water construction and improvements to water systems in local communities. Funding was also allocated for the Superfund hazardous-waste cleanup program.
The broad-ranging bill makes climate-change research a priority. It gives a 53-percent boost to federal funding for climate-change research at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Interior Department. The bill also mandates that the EPA begin developing a process for regulating greenhouse gases.
In addition, the bill increases funding for national wildlife refuges and rejects proposed cuts to the National Forest Service while supporting wildlife preparedness and suppression programs.
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June 29, 2007 -- The territory stands to get $2.8 million for improvements to the territory's wastewater systems thanks to an appropriation Wednesday by the U.S. House of Representatives.
The appropriation was included in the 2008 Interior and Environmental Appropriations bill that includes funding for environmental and conservation programs, said Delegate Donna M. Christensen in a news release issued Thursday.
The money will go for improvements to the territory's wastewater infrastructure, said V.I. Waste Management Authority spokeswoman Stella Saunders. The territory received money under this grant for the last five years, including $3.2 million in 2007, she said.
In 2006, the number stood at $4.6 million, plus $1 million in supplemental funds for the LBJ main sewer line and $235,000 for scrap-tire management. Funding stood at $4.2 million in 2005, $5 million in 2004 and $5.4 million in 2003.
The bill must first pass muster with the U.S. Senate before getting signed into law by President Bush, said Christensen aide Brian Modeste on Friday.
"It's not likely that the environmental provisions would cause him to veto it," Modeste said.
The environmental provisions were added by House Democrats to Bush's budget bill. If Bush were to veto the bill, it would only be because the dollar amount exceeded what he wanted to spend, Modeste said. A veto by Bush might hurt other Republicans, he said.
The territory will receive the money after the start of the fiscal year on Oct. 1, Modeste said.
Programs covered by the appropriations include the Clean Water State Revolving Fund, which supports projects that improve drinking water in communities across the country. Additionally, money will go to pay for sewer and water construction and improvements to water systems in local communities. Funding was also allocated for the Superfund hazardous-waste cleanup program.
The broad-ranging bill makes climate-change research a priority. It gives a 53-percent boost to federal funding for climate-change research at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Interior Department. The bill also mandates that the EPA begin developing a process for regulating greenhouse gases.
In addition, the bill increases funding for national wildlife refuges and rejects proposed cuts to the National Forest Service while supporting wildlife preparedness and suppression programs.
Back Talk Share your reaction to this news with other Source readers. Please include headline, your name and city and state/country or island where you reside.