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HomeNewsArchivesCALYPSO MONARCH WHADABLEE REIGNS AGAIN

CALYPSO MONARCH WHADABLEE REIGNS AGAIN

May 2, 2003 – The reigning calypso monarch of St. Thomas held onto his crown Thursday night before a crowd of about 2,500 people at Lionel Roberts Stadium. For St. Clair DeSilva – better known as Whadablee – the 2003 victory is the fifth consecutive win, this one gained over an all-out challenge by the first runner up, Myrel Tonge, also known as Super T.
"I'm tired, I'm a little hoarse, but this was the hardest victory," Whadablee said as he danced offstage wearing his red velvet crown and cape, the winner's trophy in his hand.
Super T, who received rousing applause for his rendition of his hit tune, "If You For Me," expressed disappointment at the judges' decision. "I'm not going to talk about it," he said. "I'm just going to leave it for another time."
Whadablee fans were in abundance at the stadium, many of them saying that while Thursday's night competition was close, it was Whadablee's lyrics that cinched the victory. They also credited the strength of Whadablee's song in round one, "Keep On Trying," a musical challenge to all contenders for the calypso crown.
There was no lack of contenders this year, with 10 challengers giving their all on stage, among them St. Croix's calypso king, the Mighty Pat; past St. Croix king, King Kan; Pepper Pat; Generic; Refector; Waggy; Gemma Noel; Sugar Dee; and Soljah.
Musical topics paid tribute to Carnival, and made appeals for the poor, for the children and for responsible government.
There were also lighthearted lyrics. Sugar Dee sang "My School Days," recalling the perplexing answers she sometimes had for her teachers' questions.
When Waggy sang about his desire for "Peace in the Middle East," he wove a double entendre about his desire for more earthly delights.
There were also pleas to government leaders to stop the gun violence and murders that have been plaguing the Virgin Islands, a theme heard in Generic's song, "Hope for Peace," and in Whadablee's "Just Because."
The Calypso Monarch competition is usually the last calypso show of the annual Carnival season, but this year organizers are bringing back the Calypso Finale that played last year in Carnival Village, with the final show set for Friday night.

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May 2, 2003 – The reigning calypso monarch of St. Thomas held onto his crown Thursday night before a crowd of about 2,500 people at Lionel Roberts Stadium. For St. Clair DeSilva – better known as Whadablee – the 2003 victory is the fifth consecutive win, this one gained over an all-out challenge by the first runner up, Myrel Tonge, also known as Super T.
"I'm tired, I'm a little hoarse, but this was the hardest victory," Whadablee said as he danced offstage wearing his red velvet crown and cape, the winner's trophy in his hand.
Super T, who received rousing applause for his rendition of his hit tune, "If You For Me," expressed disappointment at the judges' decision. "I'm not going to talk about it," he said. "I'm just going to leave it for another time."
Whadablee fans were in abundance at the stadium, many of them saying that while Thursday's night competition was close, it was Whadablee's lyrics that cinched the victory. They also credited the strength of Whadablee's song in round one, "Keep On Trying," a musical challenge to all contenders for the calypso crown.
There was no lack of contenders this year, with 10 challengers giving their all on stage, among them St. Croix's calypso king, the Mighty Pat; past St. Croix king, King Kan; Pepper Pat; Generic; Refector; Waggy; Gemma Noel; Sugar Dee; and Soljah.
Musical topics paid tribute to Carnival, and made appeals for the poor, for the children and for responsible government.
There were also lighthearted lyrics. Sugar Dee sang "My School Days," recalling the perplexing answers she sometimes had for her teachers' questions.
When Waggy sang about his desire for "Peace in the Middle East," he wove a double entendre about his desire for more earthly delights.
There were also pleas to government leaders to stop the gun violence and murders that have been plaguing the Virgin Islands, a theme heard in Generic's song, "Hope for Peace," and in Whadablee's "Just Because."
The Calypso Monarch competition is usually the last calypso show of the annual Carnival season, but this year organizers are bringing back the Calypso Finale that played last year in Carnival Village, with the final show set for Friday night.

Publisher's note : Like the St. Thomas Source now? Find out how you can love us twice as much -- and show your support for the islands' free and independent news voice ... click here.