77.7 F
Charlotte Amalie
Friday, May 20, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesKEEP BOTANY BAY FOR ALL, READER PLEADS

KEEP BOTANY BAY FOR ALL, READER PLEADS

Dear Source,
As a St. Thomas resident for more than eight years, I came to appreciate the beauty of all the Virgin Islands. Although I moved back to my native Puerto Rico last year, I still visit St. Thomas frequently to visit friends and enjoy once more the beauty that surrounds me there.
The north side of St. Thomas, containing its most — almost its only — pristine area of tropical humid forest, seems now to be threatened by a "development" that is poised to rid the island of its last large green area.
That no terrestrial area in St. Thomas has ever been declared, to my knowledge, a wildlife refuge or nature reserve has always been beyond me. Now, the last extensive tract of remaining forest is about to be damaged by more of the so-called development that has wreaked havoc in my own home island of Puerto Rico.
What a pity.
On a small island like St. Thomas, where everything is close by and where natural areas are by now practically nonexistent, why don't those developers choose to place their hotels, restaurants, whatever, in the already urbanized area of Charlotte Amalie, and then organize excursions to those same few remaining natural places?
That is ecotourism — and not doing away with nature just to make money.
I say it again: what a pity … and what a shortsightedness of the local people who let this happen.
Father Alejandro Sánchez
Carolina, Puerto Rico

Editor's note: We welcome and encourage readers to keep the dialogue going by responding to Source commentary. Letters should be e-mailed with name and place of residence to source@viaccess.net.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Keeping our community informed is our top priority.
If you have a news tip to share, please call or text us at 340-228-8784.




Support local + independent journalism in the U.S. Virgin Islands

Unlike many news organizations, we haven't put up a paywall – we want to keep our journalism as accessible as we can. Our independent journalism costs time, money and hard work to keep you informed, but we do it because we believe that it matters. We know that informed communities are empowered ones. If you appreciate our reporting and want to help make our future more secure, please consider donating.

STAY CONNECTED

20,771FansLike
4,718FollowersFollow

FROM FACEBOOK

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
Load more
Dear Source,
As a St. Thomas resident for more than eight years, I came to appreciate the beauty of all the Virgin Islands. Although I moved back to my native Puerto Rico last year, I still visit St. Thomas frequently to visit friends and enjoy once more the beauty that surrounds me there.
The north side of St. Thomas, containing its most -- almost its only -- pristine area of tropical humid forest, seems now to be threatened by a "development" that is poised to rid the island of its last large green area.
That no terrestrial area in St. Thomas has ever been declared, to my knowledge, a wildlife refuge or nature reserve has always been beyond me. Now, the last extensive tract of remaining forest is about to be damaged by more of the so-called development that has wreaked havoc in my own home island of Puerto Rico.
What a pity.
On a small island like St. Thomas, where everything is close by and where natural areas are by now practically nonexistent, why don't those developers choose to place their hotels, restaurants, whatever, in the already urbanized area of Charlotte Amalie, and then organize excursions to those same few remaining natural places?
That is ecotourism -- and not doing away with nature just to make money.
I say it again: what a pity ... and what a shortsightedness of the local people who let this happen.
Father Alejandro Sánchez
Carolina, Puerto Rico

Editor's note: We welcome and encourage readers to keep the dialogue going by responding to Source commentary. Letters should be e-mailed with name and place of residence to source@viaccess.net.