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Charlotte Amalie
Friday, May 20, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesSCHOOL SYSTEM'S FAILURE IS A PEOPLE PROBLEM

SCHOOL SYSTEM'S FAILURE IS A PEOPLE PROBLEM

Dear Source,
With regard to the Op-ed article by Dr. Edward Thomas [See "What's needed to raise those science scores"]: It is refreshing to read positive suggestions to the problems.
My initial impression is the education system is failing, not only in science testing of fourth graders but with threatened accreditation loss at the high school level, because of the culture. There is an evident lack of a work ethic.
Many appear to want on some payroll, and not everyone works. The community should be outraged at its education levels. Shame on education management! What should be the necessary dollars appear to be spent, but Virgin Islanders are not getting what they pay for.
What conclusion does one come to? I'm sure there are exceptions in dedication, but overall it's hard to understand. I do not believe the children of the Virgin Islands are stupid and not teachable. Either teachers and administrators are not qualified but have their jobs because they know someone, or they are qualified but lazy.
Excellent education administrative and teaching leaders will have a challenge, but they should be hired over locals when local teachers do not meet standards of attendance, and when their classes do not test to standard. There is a nationwide teacher shortage. However, I'm sure if there are not qualified or motivated teachers living on island, mainland teachers could be enticed to Paradise. Will this happen? No way, due to the culture of protecting local jobs at all costs.
How can proposed a technology park staff business jobs from a local population which is not educated?
Jack Townsend
Chicago

Editor's note: We welcome and encourage readers to keep the dialogue going by responding to Source commentary. Letters should be e-mailed with name and place of residence to source@viaccess.net.

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Dear Source,
With regard to the Op-ed article by Dr. Edward Thomas [See "What's needed to raise those science scores"]: It is refreshing to read positive suggestions to the problems.
My initial impression is the education system is failing, not only in science testing of fourth graders but with threatened accreditation loss at the high school level, because of the culture. There is an evident lack of a work ethic.
Many appear to want on some payroll, and not everyone works. The community should be outraged at its education levels. Shame on education management! What should be the necessary dollars appear to be spent, but Virgin Islanders are not getting what they pay for.
What conclusion does one come to? I'm sure there are exceptions in dedication, but overall it's hard to understand. I do not believe the children of the Virgin Islands are stupid and not teachable. Either teachers and administrators are not qualified but have their jobs because they know someone, or they are qualified but lazy.
Excellent education administrative and teaching leaders will have a challenge, but they should be hired over locals when local teachers do not meet standards of attendance, and when their classes do not test to standard. There is a nationwide teacher shortage. However, I'm sure if there are not qualified or motivated teachers living on island, mainland teachers could be enticed to Paradise. Will this happen? No way, due to the culture of protecting local jobs at all costs.
How can proposed a technology park staff business jobs from a local population which is not educated?
Jack Townsend
Chicago

Editor's note: We welcome and encourage readers to keep the dialogue going by responding to Source commentary. Letters should be e-mailed with name and place of residence to source@viaccess.net.