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Charlotte Amalie
Tuesday, May 24, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesMAKING SCIENCE EXCITING ISN'T ALL THAT HARD

MAKING SCIENCE EXCITING ISN'T ALL THAT HARD

Dear Source,
Kudos to Dr. Edward Thomas for his comments about the appalling report on science and math within our education system nationwide. [See "What's needed to raise those science scores".] I agree that the educational system within these islands should look outside its hallowed halls to "excite" our young people about the possibilities of "hands-on science" just outside our doors.
It's truly amazing how a simple study in nature can evolve into a complete lesson in the sciences — geometry can be used to determine the path of the sun; identifying trees using the leaves can be used from grades K-12, where the little ones learn the parts of the leaves and the seniors determine the tree and work on naming (classification) and mounting the leaves for future study by younger students.
In short, the Virgin Islands has an open classroom that can enhance the teacher's lesson plan and give the students a hands-on lesson that will leave an indelible mark on their minds and make them understand how important definitions, terminology, formulae, etc., are within the world around them.
Thanks to the V.I. Source, I was able to visit the "Nation's Report Card Science 2000" site and investigate the various questions that were asked of the students. I think the questions on the test were rather easy for a fourth grader — but, of course, a fourth grader who has studied the topic and retained the information provide.
For example, one of the questions I found interesting was "What organism can produce its own food?" Or how about "Where does rain come from?" I won't give the answers; I think everyone should take a peek at the site at least once.
We should also as parents query our children about what they are covering in class and try to develop short lessons at home and in the environs that surround us. We can quiz our children on short paragraphs or topics to make sure they understand what they read and make sure they get the major themes being covered. Make it fun — even if you hate science, you can make it fun for your child if you use simple reasoning and be patient.
Marcella Jennings
Lab director, Caribbean Safe Water Laboratory
St. Thomas

Editor's note: We welcome and encourage readers to keep the dialogue going by responding to Source commentary. Letters should be e-mailed with name and place of residence to source@viaccess.net.

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Dear Source,
Kudos to Dr. Edward Thomas for his comments about the appalling report on science and math within our education system nationwide. [See "What's needed to raise those science scores".] I agree that the educational system within these islands should look outside its hallowed halls to "excite" our young people about the possibilities of "hands-on science" just outside our doors.
It's truly amazing how a simple study in nature can evolve into a complete lesson in the sciences -- geometry can be used to determine the path of the sun; identifying trees using the leaves can be used from grades K-12, where the little ones learn the parts of the leaves and the seniors determine the tree and work on naming (classification) and mounting the leaves for future study by younger students.
In short, the Virgin Islands has an open classroom that can enhance the teacher's lesson plan and give the students a hands-on lesson that will leave an indelible mark on their minds and make them understand how important definitions, terminology, formulae, etc., are within the world around them.
Thanks to the V.I. Source, I was able to visit the "Nation's Report Card Science 2000" site and investigate the various questions that were asked of the students. I think the questions on the test were rather easy for a fourth grader -- but, of course, a fourth grader who has studied the topic and retained the information provide.
For example, one of the questions I found interesting was "What organism can produce its own food?" Or how about "Where does rain come from?" I won't give the answers; I think everyone should take a peek at the site at least once.
We should also as parents query our children about what they are covering in class and try to develop short lessons at home and in the environs that surround us. We can quiz our children on short paragraphs or topics to make sure they understand what they read and make sure they get the major themes being covered. Make it fun -- even if you hate science, you can make it fun for your child if you use simple reasoning and be patient.
Marcella Jennings
Lab director, Caribbean Safe Water Laboratory
St. Thomas

Editor's note: We welcome and encourage readers to keep the dialogue going by responding to Source commentary. Letters should be e-mailed with name and place of residence to source@viaccess.net.