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HomeNewsArchivesCORAL BAY SCHOOL GETS GRANT FOR BEACH PROJECT

CORAL BAY SCHOOL GETS GRANT FOR BEACH PROJECT

March 23, 2001 – The island's newest school has been awarded the St. John Community Foundation's first mini-grant in a program to support service-oriented projects involving local youth.
The Coral Bay School received the $481 award for its project titled "Beach Watch," a joint venture with St. John's Gallows Point Suite Resort that has both immediate and longer-term objectives.
"It is an effort to maintain the dignity and pristine appearance of the Cruz Bay Harbor beachfront," foundation executive director Mary Blazine said. "And it involves scientific study of the beachfront area to be conducted as part of the school's science classes."
The private Coral Bay School opened its doors just last fall, with classes meeting initially in Cruz Bay. Enrollment currently consists of grades 7 through 9, with 10th grade to be added in the fall, and 11th and 12th in successive years.
As part of the school's community service program, administrator/teacher Scott Crawford said, "For two hours each Wednesday afternoon, students work with a Gallows Point staff member to remove debris, plant new shrubbery and rake the beach."
Crawford's faculty/administration colleague Sabrina Boebert said the research part of the project is "a year-long study focusing on three areas: erosion/deposition cycles, pollution and water." A summary of the students' findings will be published in a brochure, she said.
Dylan Buchalter, a Coral Bay freshman, said the grant means that she and her fellow students "won't have to spend a lot of time holding food sales and car washes to raise the money we need to conduct the research. We can put all of our energy directly into the project itself."
According to Community Foundation Board member Paul Thomas, the coordinator of the new program, "The merits of this first project speak for themselves. The foundation is very pleased to see such a well-planned and beneficial project that teaches not only environmental responsibility but hands-on practical science."
Gallows Point manager Len Otley said the resort management applauds the Coral Bay administrator/teachers "for providing such a creative project for their students that benefits the entire community of St. John."
Blazine described the mini-grant program as "the first step in developing leaders of tomorrow who will have an educated environmental consciousness that starts with community service through volunteerism."
Information was provided to all of the schools on St. John soliciting applications for the first mini-grant award, Blazine said. Any youth organization may apply for grants, which range from $200 to $500. The money, which must be spent within six months of receipt, can be used for supplies but not for salaries. A 100 percent in-kind match, which can include donated time, is required.
The program is ongoing, and grant applications may be submitted at any time. Anyone wanting further information about the foundation or the mini-grants should contact Blazine by calling 693-9410 or e-mailing to andblaze@viaccess.net.

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March 23, 2001 – The island's newest school has been awarded the St. John Community Foundation's first mini-grant in a program to support service-oriented projects involving local youth.
The Coral Bay School received the $481 award for its project titled "Beach Watch," a joint venture with St. John's Gallows Point Suite Resort that has both immediate and longer-term objectives.
"It is an effort to maintain the dignity and pristine appearance of the Cruz Bay Harbor beachfront," foundation executive director Mary Blazine said. "And it involves scientific study of the beachfront area to be conducted as part of the school's science classes."
The private Coral Bay School opened its doors just last fall, with classes meeting initially in Cruz Bay. Enrollment currently consists of grades 7 through 9, with 10th grade to be added in the fall, and 11th and 12th in successive years.
As part of the school's community service program, administrator/teacher Scott Crawford said, "For two hours each Wednesday afternoon, students work with a Gallows Point staff member to remove debris, plant new shrubbery and rake the beach."
Crawford's faculty/administration colleague Sabrina Boebert said the research part of the project is "a year-long study focusing on three areas: erosion/deposition cycles, pollution and water." A summary of the students' findings will be published in a brochure, she said.
Dylan Buchalter, a Coral Bay freshman, said the grant means that she and her fellow students "won't have to spend a lot of time holding food sales and car washes to raise the money we need to conduct the research. We can put all of our energy directly into the project itself."
According to Community Foundation Board member Paul Thomas, the coordinator of the new program, "The merits of this first project speak for themselves. The foundation is very pleased to see such a well-planned and beneficial project that teaches not only environmental responsibility but hands-on practical science."
Gallows Point manager Len Otley said the resort management applauds the Coral Bay administrator/teachers "for providing such a creative project for their students that benefits the entire community of St. John."
Blazine described the mini-grant program as "the first step in developing leaders of tomorrow who will have an educated environmental consciousness that starts with community service through volunteerism."
Information was provided to all of the schools on St. John soliciting applications for the first mini-grant award, Blazine said. Any youth organization may apply for grants, which range from $200 to $500. The money, which must be spent within six months of receipt, can be used for supplies but not for salaries. A 100 percent in-kind match, which can include donated time, is required.
The program is ongoing, and grant applications may be submitted at any time. Anyone wanting further information about the foundation or the mini-grants should contact Blazine by calling 693-9410 or e-mailing to andblaze@viaccess.net.