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Charlotte Amalie
Friday, July 1, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesDR.T AND THE WOMEN - MYSTERIES OF THE DEEP

DR.T AND THE WOMEN – MYSTERIES OF THE DEEP

Well, that Southern California City of Lights has finally done it. Two hours and two minutes with a Texas gynecologist, a hitherto unexplored genre until "Dr.T and the Women." Perhaps the title should have been a dead giveaway.
Then again, that length of time isn't so frightening when the doctor, Sully Travis, aka Dr. T, is Richard Gere. However, the good doctor finds himself surrounded by more women than even he can handle, so to speak, at once. Whatever has maverick director Robert Altman wrought here?
First, there's his ailing wife, Kate, ( Farrah Fawcet), whom he adores but must exile to a mental hospital to deal with her perhaps permanent return to childhood; then there's his sister-in-law Peggy ( Laura Dern) the alcoholic; her three children, presumably normal, except for a continuing battle with Dr. T's two daughters, the engaged-to-be-married DeeDee (Kate Hudson); and the jealous Connie (Tara Reid), a conspiracy buff. Whew.
Then, stage left, enter a gorgeous golf pro named Bree (Helen Hunt), who resists D. T's bedside manner. You know, at first that is. All of this is augmented by the likes of Liv Tyler in a minor role, as merely one of a bevy of female clients who tumble in and out of his office.
Altman has paired up with writer Anne Rapp for the second time. The first was the batty "Cookie's Choice," which the critics, and the public, loved. Dr. T has put the critics on edge. Some call it a sprawling, comic romp ala Altman. Others say he should have stood in bed. All agree, however, that the ending is a whopper, either "outrageous," "optimistic" or "sober."
Nobody's letting on.
You may remember it was Altman who brought us M*A*S*H, and anything can be forgiven after that. Kate Hudson, of "Almost Famous" fame, is still shining, according to even the most severe critic.
The movie is rated R for graphic nudity and some sexuality.
It is playing at Market Square East.

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Well, that Southern California City of Lights has finally done it. Two hours and two minutes with a Texas gynecologist, a hitherto unexplored genre until "Dr.T and the Women." Perhaps the title should have been a dead giveaway.
Then again, that length of time isn't so frightening when the doctor, Sully Travis, aka Dr. T, is Richard Gere. However, the good doctor finds himself surrounded by more women than even he can handle, so to speak, at once. Whatever has maverick director Robert Altman wrought here?
First, there's his ailing wife, Kate, ( Farrah Fawcet), whom he adores but must exile to a mental hospital to deal with her perhaps permanent return to childhood; then there's his sister-in-law Peggy ( Laura Dern) the alcoholic; her three children, presumably normal, except for a continuing battle with Dr. T's two daughters, the engaged-to-be-married DeeDee (Kate Hudson); and the jealous Connie (Tara Reid), a conspiracy buff. Whew.
Then, stage left, enter a gorgeous golf pro named Bree (Helen Hunt), who resists D. T's bedside manner. You know, at first that is. All of this is augmented by the likes of Liv Tyler in a minor role, as merely one of a bevy of female clients who tumble in and out of his office.
Altman has paired up with writer Anne Rapp for the second time. The first was the batty "Cookie's Choice," which the critics, and the public, loved. Dr. T has put the critics on edge. Some call it a sprawling, comic romp ala Altman. Others say he should have stood in bed. All agree, however, that the ending is a whopper, either "outrageous," "optimistic" or "sober."
Nobody's letting on.
You may remember it was Altman who brought us M*A*S*H, and anything can be forgiven after that. Kate Hudson, of "Almost Famous" fame, is still shining, according to even the most severe critic.
The movie is rated R for graphic nudity and some sexuality.
It is playing at Market Square East.