91.1 F
Charlotte Amalie
Wednesday, June 29, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesMEN OF HONOR -- AND HEART

MEN OF HONOR — AND HEART

It can be difficult to film a true story, especially one with great possibility for bathos, and do it cleanly and effectively. "Men of Honor," from most reports, has done just that.
Cuba Gooding Jr. stars as real life Carl Brashear, the first African American to become a master diver in the Navy. Robert De Niro stars as fictional Bill Sunday, an invention said to shore up Gooding's role, and give more texture to the movie. Sunday is simultaneously Brashear's most vicious adversary, and loyal supporter, and scene stopper. ( De Niro has long had the reputation of an "actor's actor.")
Of course, it's a male bonding outing, but with a difference – some say, class. Sunday is actually a composite of two of Brashear's real life diving teachers. He is "hard-drinking, foul mouth, stubborn, brave and tough." In short, what more could one ask? Oh yes, he's also a racist.
Brashear has grown up in the sharecropper south, and has one ambition – to get into Navy diving school, which even in the 1948 desegregated Navy, most blacks were given a hard time and relegated to cooks and stewards jobs.
Brashear survives all the bigotry and becomes a diver only to suffer a horrendous accident and amputation and wind up as master chief. Gooding puts total commitment into his part, as well he should when up against De Niro. The two have excellent backup with Hal Holbrook, Charlize Theron and Michael Rapaport. It is directed by George Tillman Jr., and rated R for language.
It starts Thursday at Market Square East.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Keeping our community informed is our top priority.
If you have a news tip to share, please call or text us at 340-228-8784.




Support local + independent journalism in the U.S. Virgin Islands

Unlike many news organizations, we haven't put up a paywall – we want to keep our journalism as accessible as we can. Our independent journalism costs time, money and hard work to keep you informed, but we do it because we believe that it matters. We know that informed communities are empowered ones. If you appreciate our reporting and want to help make our future more secure, please consider donating.

STAY CONNECTED

20,771FansLike
4,758FollowersFollow
It can be difficult to film a true story, especially one with great possibility for bathos, and do it cleanly and effectively. "Men of Honor," from most reports, has done just that.
Cuba Gooding Jr. stars as real life Carl Brashear, the first African American to become a master diver in the Navy. Robert De Niro stars as fictional Bill Sunday, an invention said to shore up Gooding's role, and give more texture to the movie. Sunday is simultaneously Brashear's most vicious adversary, and loyal supporter, and scene stopper. ( De Niro has long had the reputation of an "actor's actor.")
Of course, it's a male bonding outing, but with a difference – some say, class. Sunday is actually a composite of two of Brashear's real life diving teachers. He is "hard-drinking, foul mouth, stubborn, brave and tough." In short, what more could one ask? Oh yes, he's also a racist.
Brashear has grown up in the sharecropper south, and has one ambition – to get into Navy diving school, which even in the 1948 desegregated Navy, most blacks were given a hard time and relegated to cooks and stewards jobs.
Brashear survives all the bigotry and becomes a diver only to suffer a horrendous accident and amputation and wind up as master chief. Gooding puts total commitment into his part, as well he should when up against De Niro. The two have excellent backup with Hal Holbrook, Charlize Theron and Michael Rapaport. It is directed by George Tillman Jr., and rated R for language.
It starts Thursday at Market Square East.