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Sunday, July 3, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesSHOPPING FOR TOYS? MAKE SAFETY A TOP PRIORITY

SHOPPING FOR TOYS? MAKE SAFETY A TOP PRIORITY

It's important to keep safety in mind when choosing holiday gifts for young children. The Licensing and Consumer Affairs Department offers toy safety tips for shoppers.
"Toys are an important part of holiday gift-giving," Licensing and Consumer Affairs Commissioner Andrew Rutnik said, and his department wants to insure that the public is aware of potential hazards. Last year, he said, according to the U.S. Consumer Safety Commission, there were 14 toy-related deaths and estimates of more than 120,000 children being treated in hospital emergency rooms for injuries from toys.
Read labels carefully, Rutnik urged shoppers. Labels are required on all toys marketed for children ages 3 to 6 and for those for younger children which might pose a choking hazard. These labels tell the consumer why a particular toy may not be safe for a child.
The following tips should help in selecting appropriate toys:
* Select toys suited to the age of the child. Toys too advanced may pose a safety hazard.
* For infants who still mouth objects, avoid toys with small moveable parts.
* Look for sturdy construction — tightly secured eyes and noses on cuddly animals, dolls and action figures, for example.
* Don't buy electric toys with heating elements for children under 8 years of age.
* Read labels to check for age recommendations.
* Check instructions for clarity.
* Remove and discard plastic wrappings which could cause suffocation.
Rutnick said that common sense and these safety suggestions should insure a safe and happy Christmas for small children, and for their families and loved ones, as well.

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It's important to keep safety in mind when choosing holiday gifts for young children. The Licensing and Consumer Affairs Department offers toy safety tips for shoppers.
"Toys are an important part of holiday gift-giving," Licensing and Consumer Affairs Commissioner Andrew Rutnik said, and his department wants to insure that the public is aware of potential hazards. Last year, he said, according to the U.S. Consumer Safety Commission, there were 14 toy-related deaths and estimates of more than 120,000 children being treated in hospital emergency rooms for injuries from toys.
Read labels carefully, Rutnik urged shoppers. Labels are required on all toys marketed for children ages 3 to 6 and for those for younger children which might pose a choking hazard. These labels tell the consumer why a particular toy may not be safe for a child.
The following tips should help in selecting appropriate toys:
* Select toys suited to the age of the child. Toys too advanced may pose a safety hazard.
* For infants who still mouth objects, avoid toys with small moveable parts.
* Look for sturdy construction -- tightly secured eyes and noses on cuddly animals, dolls and action figures, for example.
* Don't buy electric toys with heating elements for children under 8 years of age.
* Read labels to check for age recommendations.
* Check instructions for clarity.
* Remove and discard plastic wrappings which could cause suffocation.
Rutnick said that common sense and these safety suggestions should insure a safe and happy Christmas for small children, and for their families and loved ones, as well.