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Friday, August 19, 2022
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BILL BANNING INCINERATION ON HOLD

The bill to ban burning of solid waste has been held in committee for further review. Sen. Adlah "Foncie" Donastorg, chair of the Committee on Planning and Environmental Protection, said after the committee meeting Monday that the bill needed more specific guidelines.
Donastorg said he introduced the bill because of his concern for public health.
In addition to air pollution, Donastorg pointed out the potential for contamination to water supplies in a place where water is collected on roofs. The danger is especially great to "homeowners who live closest to the Bovoni Landfill," he said.
However, some testifiers Monday were concerned that the provisions were too broad and could limit the government's options for solid waste disposal.
For example, several questioned what constituted "agricultural waste," which is exempt under the terms of the bill.
Dean Plaskett, acting commissioner of Planning and Natural Resources, and Harold J. Thompson, acting commissioner of Public Works, questioned what would be done with hospital solid waste.
Plaskett said he was not willing to discount any options for solid waste disposal.
One solution discussed was gasification.
Helen Gjessing, environmentalist and retired biology professor, who testified on behalf of the League of Women Voters, said, "Gasifiers are far superior in many ways. Simply put, they are cheaper and cleaner."
However she also testified that use of gasification is likely to discourage the development of other alternatives such as recycling and reduction, "because the larger the facility, the more cost-efficient it is and the larger the facility, the more trash is required and the more trash that is gasified, the less trash is recycled, reused or reduced."
Gjessing said the most important thing was having a comprehensive solid waste management plan, adding that the planning should be the responsibility of the Planning and Natural Resources Department.

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The bill to ban burning of solid waste has been held in committee for further review. Sen. Adlah "Foncie" Donastorg, chair of the Committee on Planning and Environmental Protection, said after the committee meeting Monday that the bill needed more specific guidelines.
Donastorg said he introduced the bill because of his concern for public health.
In addition to air pollution, Donastorg pointed out the potential for contamination to water supplies in a place where water is collected on roofs. The danger is especially great to "homeowners who live closest to the Bovoni Landfill," he said.
However, some testifiers Monday were concerned that the provisions were too broad and could limit the government's options for solid waste disposal.
For example, several questioned what constituted "agricultural waste," which is exempt under the terms of the bill.
Dean Plaskett, acting commissioner of Planning and Natural Resources, and Harold J. Thompson, acting commissioner of Public Works, questioned what would be done with hospital solid waste.
Plaskett said he was not willing to discount any options for solid waste disposal.
One solution discussed was gasification.
Helen Gjessing, environmentalist and retired biology professor, who testified on behalf of the League of Women Voters, said, "Gasifiers are far superior in many ways. Simply put, they are cheaper and cleaner."
However she also testified that use of gasification is likely to discourage the development of other alternatives such as recycling and reduction, "because the larger the facility, the more cost-efficient it is and the larger the facility, the more trash is required and the more trash that is gasified, the less trash is recycled, reused or reduced."
Gjessing said the most important thing was having a comprehensive solid waste management plan, adding that the planning should be the responsibility of the Planning and Natural Resources Department.