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Monday, August 15, 2022
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STUDY SUPPORTS ZONE A COMPLAINTS

The Police Department's Zone A Command building on the Charlotte Amalie waterfront remains under attack from its own personnel, supported by the findings of an indoor air-quality inspection by the Department of Planning and Natural Resources.
The report, by Leonard Reed, DPNR assistant environmental protection director, was of an inspection conducted last Friday. It cited multiple problems and recommended that personnel be relocated elsewhere to work, the V.I. Independent reported.
Reed's report described the 15-year-old structure as a "sick building." His report cited 15 problem areas including water leaks in several rooms; inadequate ventilation; wet and damp areas conducive to the growth of mold, mildew, fungi and bacteria; actual mildew and fungi growing in restrooms and holding cells; dust that appeared to contain carbon matter from the emissions of vehicular traffic on the waterfront highway in front of the building; and a manhole that could allow sewer gas into the building courtyard.
Reed recommended that the Police Department "form a committee to investigate, review and offer solutions to this most grave situation."
Police have complained publicly of the building's conditions for about five years. In January, personnel stationed there staged a protest march to Government House and filed a complaint with the federal Occupational Safety and Health Agency.
Acting police chief Jose Garcia said OSHA has notified the department by letter that the agency is satisfied that the department is working to address the problems, The Daily News reported. However, the newspaper said, OSHA director Marcelle Heywood could not confirm this immediately but said the agency has not received any recent complaints about Zone A Command.
Elmo Raymo, president of the Police Benevolent Association, said Department of Public Works employees installed paneling to keep dust from entering the building around air- conditioning units on Wednesday and made other minor improvements. But he called for an overall major renovation plan, instead of superficial stop-gap measures.

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The Police Department's Zone A Command building on the Charlotte Amalie waterfront remains under attack from its own personnel, supported by the findings of an indoor air-quality inspection by the Department of Planning and Natural Resources.
The report, by Leonard Reed, DPNR assistant environmental protection director, was of an inspection conducted last Friday. It cited multiple problems and recommended that personnel be relocated elsewhere to work, the V.I. Independent reported.
Reed's report described the 15-year-old structure as a "sick building." His report cited 15 problem areas including water leaks in several rooms; inadequate ventilation; wet and damp areas conducive to the growth of mold, mildew, fungi and bacteria; actual mildew and fungi growing in restrooms and holding cells; dust that appeared to contain carbon matter from the emissions of vehicular traffic on the waterfront highway in front of the building; and a manhole that could allow sewer gas into the building courtyard.
Reed recommended that the Police Department "form a committee to investigate, review and offer solutions to this most grave situation."
Police have complained publicly of the building's conditions for about five years. In January, personnel stationed there staged a protest march to Government House and filed a complaint with the federal Occupational Safety and Health Agency.
Acting police chief Jose Garcia said OSHA has notified the department by letter that the agency is satisfied that the department is working to address the problems, The Daily News reported. However, the newspaper said, OSHA director Marcelle Heywood could not confirm this immediately but said the agency has not received any recent complaints about Zone A Command.
Elmo Raymo, president of the Police Benevolent Association, said Department of Public Works employees installed paneling to keep dust from entering the building around air- conditioning units on Wednesday and made other minor improvements. But he called for an overall major renovation plan, instead of superficial stop-gap measures.