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Charlotte Amalie
Wednesday, July 6, 2022
HomeNewsLocal governmentProgress Made in Disposal Operations of Hurricane Debris

Progress Made in Disposal Operations of Hurricane Debris

Hurricane debris piled in Coral Bay, St. John.
Federal funds coming into the territory helped the islands recover from Hurricanes Irma and Maria by being used to collect debris.

Hurricanes Irma and Maria left behind 580,000 cubic yards of debris in the U.S. Virgin Islands, enough to fill 177 Olympic-sized swimming pools. All eligible debris has now been collected, and significant progress is being made toward the goal of shipping it away from the territory.

“Debris collection, processing and disposal are signs of progress after a hurricane, not to mention two major hurricanes in a two-week period,” said FEMA Federal Coordinating Officer William L. Vogel.

“FEMA has worked with the Virgin Islands government to assure management of this debris is in compliance with all necessary federal and territorial laws and regulations. We’ve come a long way, and we’re looking forward to the completion of hurricane debris disposal during the next few months.”

More than 194,000 cubic yards of vegetative and construction debris from St. Thomas and St. John is temporarily staged at the Cancryn site on St. Thomas. It was collected, sorted and reduced to a relatively uniform size. Barging of debris from the site is anticipated to begin in August.

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On St. Croix, more than 385,000 cubic yards of debris has been collected and is temporarily staged at Body Slob. It is expected that sorting, reduction and permitting will be completed in time to begin barging away this fall.

Disaster officials are assuring the public that hurricane debris at the two staging areas is being responsibly managed and monitored to reduce risks to the environment and to public health. To prevent spontaneous combustion, vegetative debris must be regularly turned and cooled. Otherwise, it poses a serious risk of starting a fire that could spread. No debris is being burned or composted.

Residents should also be aware that debris removal across the territory may involve slow-moving trucks carrying uncovered loads. Motorists and pedestrians should allow plenty of room for crews to operate.

Recovery officials ask Virgin Islanders for their patience as the process for debris disposal is completed. Questions about debris disposal may be emailed to FEMA-STT-Debris-Site@fema.dhs.gov.

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Hurricane debris piled in Coral Bay, St. John.
Federal funds coming into the territory helped the islands recover from Hurricanes Irma and Maria by being used to collect debris.
Hurricanes Irma and Maria left behind 580,000 cubic yards of debris in the U.S. Virgin Islands, enough to fill 177 Olympic-sized swimming pools. All eligible debris has now been collected, and significant progress is being made toward the goal of shipping it away from the territory. “Debris collection, processing and disposal are signs of progress after a hurricane, not to mention two major hurricanes in a two-week period,” said FEMA Federal Coordinating Officer William L. Vogel. “FEMA has worked with the Virgin Islands government to assure management of this debris is in compliance with all necessary federal and territorial laws and regulations. We’ve come a long way, and we’re looking forward to the completion of hurricane debris disposal during the next few months.” More than 194,000 cubic yards of vegetative and construction debris from St. Thomas and St. John is temporarily staged at the Cancryn site on St. Thomas. It was collected, sorted and reduced to a relatively uniform size. Barging of debris from the site is anticipated to begin in August. On St. Croix, more than 385,000 cubic yards of debris has been collected and is temporarily staged at Body Slob. It is expected that sorting, reduction and permitting will be completed in time to begin barging away this fall. Disaster officials are assuring the public that hurricane debris at the two staging areas is being responsibly managed and monitored to reduce risks to the environment and to public health. To prevent spontaneous combustion, vegetative debris must be regularly turned and cooled. Otherwise, it poses a serious risk of starting a fire that could spread. No debris is being burned or composted. Residents should also be aware that debris removal across the territory may involve slow-moving trucks carrying uncovered loads. Motorists and pedestrians should allow plenty of room for crews to operate. Recovery officials ask Virgin Islanders for their patience as the process for debris disposal is completed. Questions about debris disposal may be emailed to FEMA-STT-Debris-Site@fema.dhs.gov.