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Charlotte Amalie
Sunday, May 22, 2022
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A Pair of Active Weather Systems Expected To Have Minimal Effect On Virgin Islands Weather Conditions

Two active weather systems in the Tropical Atlantic are not expected to have any significant impact on local weather conditions. Officials at the National Weather Service in San Juan said Friday that in both instances, the active weather associated with the areas of disturbed weather is forecast to remain to the north and northeast of the Virgin Islands.

The first weather system, which on its forecast path should pass to the northeast of the Virgin Islands on Saturday, is an area of cloudiness and showers located just to the north of the northern Leeward Islands. The tropical wave is moving to the west-northwestward with no signs of organization and environmental conditions are not expected to be conducive for significant development. In fact, the system has a mere 10 percent chance of development over the next five days.

The second system is a large area of disturbed weather associated with a westward moving tropical wave. On Friday morning, the wave was 1,200 miles east of the Lesser Antilles and becoming better organized. Hurricane forecasters have been projecting for several days that this system could evolve into either a tropical depression or a tropical storm over the weekend or early next week.

Although the system has been on a westerly course over the last few days, forecast models have projected that the wave will turn to the west-northwest. On that path, the bulk of the active weather associated with the system will remain well to the northeast of the local area when the wave passes on Wednesday or Thursday of next week. On Friday morning, forecasters projected a 30 percent chance of further development over the next two days and a 70 percent chance of further development over the next five days.

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While neither system is a threat to the Virgin Islands at the present time, forecasters urged residents and visitors to keep abreast of the latest storm information until both systems have passed the local region.

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Two active weather systems in the Tropical Atlantic are not expected to have any significant impact on local weather conditions. Officials at the National Weather Service in San Juan said Friday that in both instances, the active weather associated with the areas of disturbed weather is forecast to remain to the north and northeast of the Virgin Islands.

The first weather system, which on its forecast path should pass to the northeast of the Virgin Islands on Saturday, is an area of cloudiness and showers located just to the north of the northern Leeward Islands. The tropical wave is moving to the west-northwestward with no signs of organization and environmental conditions are not expected to be conducive for significant development. In fact, the system has a mere 10 percent chance of development over the next five days.

The second system is a large area of disturbed weather associated with a westward moving tropical wave. On Friday morning, the wave was 1,200 miles east of the Lesser Antilles and becoming better organized. Hurricane forecasters have been projecting for several days that this system could evolve into either a tropical depression or a tropical storm over the weekend or early next week.

Although the system has been on a westerly course over the last few days, forecast models have projected that the wave will turn to the west-northwest. On that path, the bulk of the active weather associated with the system will remain well to the northeast of the local area when the wave passes on Wednesday or Thursday of next week. On Friday morning, forecasters projected a 30 percent chance of further development over the next two days and a 70 percent chance of further development over the next five days.

While neither system is a threat to the Virgin Islands at the present time, forecasters urged residents and visitors to keep abreast of the latest storm information until both systems have passed the local region.