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Charlotte Amalie
Friday, July 1, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesHEALTH CLINIC REDEDICATED

HEALTH CLINIC REDEDICATED

In a warm and sometimes emotional ceremony Friday morning, the newly enhanced Community Health Clinic at the Roy L. Schneider Hospital was rededicated, and many employees were honored, including those who created the now brightly decorated quarters.
The ceremony was interrupted with hand clapping and even occasional cheers as one after another, 21 employees marched to the podium to receive certificates of appreciation.
"This is the first time we have had anything like this," Phyllis Wallace, deputy health commissioner said, "It's really special." Dr. Audria A. Thomas, acting district health officer in charge of the clinic, agreed: "They deserve praise; they do a wonderful job."
The feeling in the small but cheery quarters was definitely upbeat, as employees joked with one another over the awards. "Oh no, not her," one said, with a big grin.
The clinic renovation began in late November, but it remained open throughout the rebuilding ordeal. "We just set up shop along the other wall, and used curtains to set areas off so we could continue to work," Thomas, who has been in her post 15 years, said with pride.
The room is hardly recognizable from its old demeanor. There are three client windows, set back to afford clients the privacy the old clinic was lacking. "Confidentiality is very important," said Wallace. The room is painted a bright blue, with a reception area partitioned off in front, and new seats, which were donated by the V. I. Port Authority from the airport reception area.
Lee Vanterpool, public information officer and master of ceremonies, pointed out the new computer system just installed, called Health-Pro. "It's completely updated, so when a client comes, you can simply bring up his or her record in a minute," he said, "and it's confidential." Vanterpool, like Wallace and Thomas, stressed the importance of protecting the client's privacy.
"It used to be a client would come in here at 6 a.m. and sit and wait to sign in at 8 a.m." he said, "now, very soon, they will be able to make appointments."
There are actually 15 clinics in one, ranging from pediatrics and OB-Gyn to orthopedics and neurology, and they see between 100 and 150 patients a day.
The clinic, a division of the Health Department, has been in its same location since moving from the old Knud Hansen Hospital in 1984, "and this is our first refurbishing," Thomas said. Her enthusiasm was contagious as she greeted each employee, handing out the awards. First they gave appreciation certificates to the maintenance crew who created the new clinic. "It was an in-house job," Thomas said.
Receiving the maintenance awards were: Ernest Richardson, maintenance chief, Ronald Henry, Kirby Francis, Vernon Ferris, Julian Williams, E. Richardson, designer, Donald Delsol, Ed Fleming, Ed Parris, Clinton John, George Richardson, Alex Gabriel and Melvin Gumbs. A special award was given to the sole female member of the maintenance staff, Emily Thomas.
Also honored were: Carol Stagger, home care; Karen Rey, RN, Louise Callwood certified nurse assistant, Denise Williams, clerk; Kenya Barotti, revenue services; Mike Alcorn, director of computers and Emile Francis, computer assistant (and son of the late Milo Francis).
Addressing the group along with Thomas and Vanterpool, were: Lucien A. Moolenaar, deputy health commissioner; Athenia Williams-Smith, program administrator; Genevieve Donovan, head nurse; and Mavis Matthew, acting health commissioner, who apologized for being late as her flight from St. Croix had been delayed.
One and all expressed appreciation for the dedicated staff, and delight at the newly refurbished clinic. Reverend Ambrose Gumbs of St. Andrews Episcopal Church performed the invocation and benediction.
Thomas noted that the clinic also serves as a specialty center after hurricanes, or any disaster, as well as locale for several after school tutoring programs and prenatal instruction clinics.
Thomas and Wallace sat chatting about the remodeling after the ceremony, "It's nice, we're happy," they said, "But we really need a building of our own – that's our prayer."

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In a warm and sometimes emotional ceremony Friday morning, the newly enhanced Community Health Clinic at the Roy L. Schneider Hospital was rededicated, and many employees were honored, including those who created the now brightly decorated quarters.
The ceremony was interrupted with hand clapping and even occasional cheers as one after another, 21 employees marched to the podium to receive certificates of appreciation.
"This is the first time we have had anything like this," Phyllis Wallace, deputy health commissioner said, "It's really special." Dr. Audria A. Thomas, acting district health officer in charge of the clinic, agreed: "They deserve praise; they do a wonderful job."
The feeling in the small but cheery quarters was definitely upbeat, as employees joked with one another over the awards. "Oh no, not her," one said, with a big grin.
The clinic renovation began in late November, but it remained open throughout the rebuilding ordeal. "We just set up shop along the other wall, and used curtains to set areas off so we could continue to work," Thomas, who has been in her post 15 years, said with pride.
The room is hardly recognizable from its old demeanor. There are three client windows, set back to afford clients the privacy the old clinic was lacking. "Confidentiality is very important," said Wallace. The room is painted a bright blue, with a reception area partitioned off in front, and new seats, which were donated by the V. I. Port Authority from the airport reception area.
Lee Vanterpool, public information officer and master of ceremonies, pointed out the new computer system just installed, called Health-Pro. "It's completely updated, so when a client comes, you can simply bring up his or her record in a minute," he said, "and it's confidential." Vanterpool, like Wallace and Thomas, stressed the importance of protecting the client's privacy.
"It used to be a client would come in here at 6 a.m. and sit and wait to sign in at 8 a.m." he said, "now, very soon, they will be able to make appointments."
There are actually 15 clinics in one, ranging from pediatrics and OB-Gyn to orthopedics and neurology, and they see between 100 and 150 patients a day.
The clinic, a division of the Health Department, has been in its same location since moving from the old Knud Hansen Hospital in 1984, "and this is our first refurbishing," Thomas said. Her enthusiasm was contagious as she greeted each employee, handing out the awards. First they gave appreciation certificates to the maintenance crew who created the new clinic. "It was an in-house job," Thomas said.
Receiving the maintenance awards were: Ernest Richardson, maintenance chief, Ronald Henry, Kirby Francis, Vernon Ferris, Julian Williams, E. Richardson, designer, Donald Delsol, Ed Fleming, Ed Parris, Clinton John, George Richardson, Alex Gabriel and Melvin Gumbs. A special award was given to the sole female member of the maintenance staff, Emily Thomas.
Also honored were: Carol Stagger, home care; Karen Rey, RN, Louise Callwood certified nurse assistant, Denise Williams, clerk; Kenya Barotti, revenue services; Mike Alcorn, director of computers and Emile Francis, computer assistant (and son of the late Milo Francis).
Addressing the group along with Thomas and Vanterpool, were: Lucien A. Moolenaar, deputy health commissioner; Athenia Williams-Smith, program administrator; Genevieve Donovan, head nurse; and Mavis Matthew, acting health commissioner, who apologized for being late as her flight from St. Croix had been delayed.
One and all expressed appreciation for the dedicated staff, and delight at the newly refurbished clinic. Reverend Ambrose Gumbs of St. Andrews Episcopal Church performed the invocation and benediction.
Thomas noted that the clinic also serves as a specialty center after hurricanes, or any disaster, as well as locale for several after school tutoring programs and prenatal instruction clinics.
Thomas and Wallace sat chatting about the remodeling after the ceremony, "It's nice, we're happy," they said, "But we really need a building of our own – that's our prayer."