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Charlotte Amalie
Friday, May 20, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesTIME TO LOOK AT CAUSE AND EFFECT

TIME TO LOOK AT CAUSE AND EFFECT

At the core of some philosophies there is a belief in cause and effect, or put another way, watch out!, whatever you do will cause something else to change or happen. If we apply this philosophy to our modus operandi in the V. I., can it help to explain why things are the way they are?
Long-distance access: Is it my imagination that there is a direct relationship between heavy cruise ships days and the recording I get telling me that "all circuits are busy, try again later," when I try to call off-island? Can we get that fixed, please?
Trash: Is there a connection between what seems to be an ever increasing number of "mobile" food vendors in town or it seems like at every previously unspoiled lookout area and the proliferation of trash all over our roadsides?
Liquor: Everywhere it seems beer or alcoholic drinks are for sale, including "mobile" food vendors. Now I read (on the same day, I might add, that Delegate Christensen-Christian announces a new federal grant intended to target alcohol abuse prevention among our students.) that vendors in the Vendor’s Plaza will be allowed to get a licence to officially sell alcoholic beverages. Correct me if I am wrong, wasn’t Vendor’s Plaza supposed to be a locale where people could sell their local wares and crafts (not that much such is sold there)? Why are we increasing potential sites for alcohol sale while simultaneously teaching our children the ill effects that alcohol and drugs can have on their lives? Besides, who wants people standing around downtown drinking?
Car accidents: It seems that more pedestrians are being hurt or killed by drivers on our roads. We have no open bottle laws and I have never heard, as elsewhere, of bar owners being held liable for accidents that their patrons cause as they drive home in a drunken state. Would it make a difference if we understood that driving impaired is a risk to all of us not just the drunk driver?
Police alleged assaults on citizens: We are hearing or we read in the news some police officers have allegedly assaulted citizens. Simultaneously we are told, that the police force is understaffed, resulting in frequent overtime and have poor working conditions. Heavy use of overtime, combined with working ever-changing shifts, can be mentally challenging. Is there any correlation between these factors and the alleged incidents where they appear to respond most inappropriately (read violently) to everyday residents or visitors?
Calypsos: Years ago, many well-known calypso singers, both from the Virgin Islands and other neighboring islands, sang calypsos laced with sexual innuendo. The songs left much to the imagination and were enjoyed. We see evidence of ever increasing sexual overtones in children at earlier and earlier ages in the V.I., is there a connection between this and the blatantly sexual calypsos that some of the calypsonians now sing?
I am not intending to simplify all behavior in the Virgin Islands by saying, for example, we have no open bottle law, so we have more accidents. I am saying that the more we are desensitized to behavior the more we accept it and the more we will allow it to continue. Behavior, both positive and negative, is learned and takes years to develop. What I am questioning is whether we are seeing an increase in socially unacceptable or criminal acts because of things we are doing or not doing. Perhaps the University of the Virgin Islands can evaluate this through investigative studies and recommend corrective action(s).
Along these lines, it seems the University has already taken steps to make sure that our kids are academically prepared for the sheer numbers of jobs that are technology based. My congratulations to them in their upcoming plan to have a six-week residential free program, this summer, for seventh grade through high school intended to immerse them in an intensive science and math learning program that sounds challenging, fun and well thought out. This corresponds nicely to a society driven by technology-based jobs. Thank you Dr. Kean, thanks to everyone at the University who are involved in this new program to make sure our kids too will be ready.
Editor’s note: Catherine Lockhart Mills of St. Thomas, a former Human Services commissioner, holds a master’s degree in social work. She is a regular columnist at The Source. You can send comments to her on the articles she writes or topics you would like her to address at source@viaccess.net

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At the core of some philosophies there is a belief in cause and effect, or put another way, watch out!, whatever you do will cause something else to change or happen. If we apply this philosophy to our modus operandi in the V. I., can it help to explain why things are the way they are?
Long-distance access: Is it my imagination that there is a direct relationship between heavy cruise ships days and the recording I get telling me that "all circuits are busy, try again later," when I try to call off-island? Can we get that fixed, please?
Trash: Is there a connection between what seems to be an ever increasing number of "mobile" food vendors in town or it seems like at every previously unspoiled lookout area and the proliferation of trash all over our roadsides?
Liquor: Everywhere it seems beer or alcoholic drinks are for sale, including "mobile" food vendors. Now I read (on the same day, I might add, that Delegate Christensen-Christian announces a new federal grant intended to target alcohol abuse prevention among our students.) that vendors in the Vendor’s Plaza will be allowed to get a licence to officially sell alcoholic beverages. Correct me if I am wrong, wasn’t Vendor’s Plaza supposed to be a locale where people could sell their local wares and crafts (not that much such is sold there)? Why are we increasing potential sites for alcohol sale while simultaneously teaching our children the ill effects that alcohol and drugs can have on their lives? Besides, who wants people standing around downtown drinking?
Car accidents: It seems that more pedestrians are being hurt or killed by drivers on our roads. We have no open bottle laws and I have never heard, as elsewhere, of bar owners being held liable for accidents that their patrons cause as they drive home in a drunken state. Would it make a difference if we understood that driving impaired is a risk to all of us not just the drunk driver?
Police alleged assaults on citizens: We are hearing or we read in the news some police officers have allegedly assaulted citizens. Simultaneously we are told, that the police force is understaffed, resulting in frequent overtime and have poor working conditions. Heavy use of overtime, combined with working ever-changing shifts, can be mentally challenging. Is there any correlation between these factors and the alleged incidents where they appear to respond most inappropriately (read violently) to everyday residents or visitors?
Calypsos: Years ago, many well-known calypso singers, both from the Virgin Islands and other neighboring islands, sang calypsos laced with sexual innuendo. The songs left much to the imagination and were enjoyed. We see evidence of ever increasing sexual overtones in children at earlier and earlier ages in the V.I., is there a connection between this and the blatantly sexual calypsos that some of the calypsonians now sing?
I am not intending to simplify all behavior in the Virgin Islands by saying, for example, we have no open bottle law, so we have more accidents. I am saying that the more we are desensitized to behavior the more we accept it and the more we will allow it to continue. Behavior, both positive and negative, is learned and takes years to develop. What I am questioning is whether we are seeing an increase in socially unacceptable or criminal acts because of things we are doing or not doing. Perhaps the University of the Virgin Islands can evaluate this through investigative studies and recommend corrective action(s).
Along these lines, it seems the University has already taken steps to make sure that our kids are academically prepared for the sheer numbers of jobs that are technology based. My congratulations to them in their upcoming plan to have a six-week residential free program, this summer, for seventh grade through high school intended to immerse them in an intensive science and math learning program that sounds challenging, fun and well thought out. This corresponds nicely to a society driven by technology-based jobs. Thank you Dr. Kean, thanks to everyone at the University who are involved in this new program to make sure our kids too will be ready.
Editor’s note: Catherine Lockhart Mills of St. Thomas, a former Human Services commissioner, holds a master’s degree in social work. She is a regular columnist at The Source. You can send comments to her on the articles she writes or topics you would like her to address at source@viaccess.net