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Charlotte Amalie
Friday, August 12, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesGASOLINE SEEN AS POSSIBLE WATER CONTAMINANT

GASOLINE SEEN AS POSSIBLE WATER CONTAMINANT

Gasoline is being considered as one possible source of water contamination in cisterns at the Joseph Sibilly School and its James Monroe Annex, according to the head of the Planning and Natural Resources Department division investigating the situation.
Hollis Griffin, head of the department's Environmental Protection Division, made the comment to Radio One News and also said there is a possibility that the cisterns were deliberately contaminated. However, he said, PNR has not asked law enforcement authorities to get involved in the ongoing investigation.
Environmental protection personnel are "trying to assess what kind of work was being done" at the school sites that might have contributed to the contamination, Griffin said.
In tests conducted in June, different combinations of toxins known as volatile organic chemicals, or VOCs, were found in water taken from each of the two school sites. Chloroform, a volatile toxic and carcinogenic liquid, was found in water from both locations.
Sen. Adlah "Foncie" Donastorg, who chairs the Legislature's Planning and Environmental Protection Committee, said the committee hearing scheduled for tonight will address these concerns as well as many others. He told Radio One that he and Sen. Norman Jn-Baptiste, chair of the Education Committee, are "combining efforts" to seek answers to all of the questions concerning the water contamination and to ensure that such problems not occur again.
Donastorg's committee meets at 7 p.m. in the legislative chambers. He has asked personnel from the Education, Health, and Planning and Natural Resources Departments to testify and has urged Sibilly parents and others concerned about the water situation in the schools to be present. He said he expects a second hearing will be held on St. Croix soon.
Editor's note: See preceding story headlined "48 pupils, teachers get exams, blood tests" for further information.

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Gasoline is being considered as one possible source of water contamination in cisterns at the Joseph Sibilly School and its James Monroe Annex, according to the head of the Planning and Natural Resources Department division investigating the situation.
Hollis Griffin, head of the department's Environmental Protection Division, made the comment to Radio One News and also said there is a possibility that the cisterns were deliberately contaminated. However, he said, PNR has not asked law enforcement authorities to get involved in the ongoing investigation.
Environmental protection personnel are "trying to assess what kind of work was being done" at the school sites that might have contributed to the contamination, Griffin said.
In tests conducted in June, different combinations of toxins known as volatile organic chemicals, or VOCs, were found in water taken from each of the two school sites. Chloroform, a volatile toxic and carcinogenic liquid, was found in water from both locations.
Sen. Adlah "Foncie" Donastorg, who chairs the Legislature's Planning and Environmental Protection Committee, said the committee hearing scheduled for tonight will address these concerns as well as many others. He told Radio One that he and Sen. Norman Jn-Baptiste, chair of the Education Committee, are "combining efforts" to seek answers to all of the questions concerning the water contamination and to ensure that such problems not occur again.
Donastorg's committee meets at 7 p.m. in the legislative chambers. He has asked personnel from the Education, Health, and Planning and Natural Resources Departments to testify and has urged Sibilly parents and others concerned about the water situation in the schools to be present. He said he expects a second hearing will be held on St. Croix soon.
Editor's note: See preceding story headlined "48 pupils, teachers get exams, blood tests" for further information.