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Dockside Bookshop Book Picks

Dockside Bookshop – Your Caribbean Bookstore
Our new hours are Monday – Friday, 8a.m. to 6p.m.
Saturday, 9a.m. – 5p.m.
Sunday, 11a.m. – 3p.m.
Local Author Signs Books at Dockside
Dockside Bookshop will hold a book signing for local author Gillian Royes from 5-6 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 18, at Havensight, St. Thomas.
Royes begins his detective series with “The Goat Woman of Largo Bay,” which features Shad, a bartender in a fishing village in Jamaica, who is the community problem-solver and right hand of Eric, an American who owns the bar and a hotel that has been left in ruins by a hurricane.
BOOK PICKS FOR THE SEASON
“The Son of Neptune” by Rick Riordan
“The Son of Neptune” by Rick Riordan, Hyperion Books (Harper), fiction – young adult, 513 pgs., $12.00
In The Lost Hero, three demigods named Jason, Piper and Leo made their first visit to Camp Half-Blood, where they inherited a quest:
Seven half-bloods shall answer the call,
To storm or fire the world must fall.
An oath to keep with a final breath,
And foes bear arms to the Doors of Death.
Who are the other four mentioned in the prophesy? The answer may lie in another camp miles away, where a new camper has shown up and appears to be the son of Neptune, god of the sea. . . .
Percy is confused. When he awoke from his long sleep, he didn’t know much more than his name. Somehow he has managed to make it to a camp for half-bloods, but it doesn’t ring any bells with him. The only thing he can recall from his past is another name: Annabeth.
Hazel is supposed to be dead. When she lived before, she didn’t do a very good job of it. Now, because of a mistake she made back then, the future of the world is at risk. Hazel wishes she could ride away from it all on the stallion that appears in her dreams.
Frank is a klutz. His grandmother says he is descended from heroes, but he doesn’t see it. His bulky physique makes him feel like an ox, especially in front of Hazel, his closest friend. He trusts her completely—enough to share the secret he holds close to his heart.
Beginning at the “other” camp for half-bloods and extending as far as the land beyond the gods, this breathtaking second installment in the Heroes of Olympus series introduces new demigods, revives fearsome monsters, and features other remarkable creatures, all destined to play a part in the Prophecy of Seven.
“Snuff” by Terry Pratchett, Harper, fiction hardcover, 416 pgs, $25.99
At long last, Lady Sybil has lured her husband, Sam Vimes, on a well-deserved holiday away from the crime and grime of Ankh-Morpork. But for the commander of the City Watch, relaxation in the country is anything but relaxing. The balls, the teas, the muck—not to mention all that fresh air and birdsong—are more than a bit taxing on a cynical city-born-and-bred copper.
Yet a policeman will find a crime anywhere if he decides to look hard enough, and it’s not long before a body is discovered, and Sam—out of his jurisdiction, out of his element, and out of bacon sandwiches (thanks to his well-meaning wife)—must rely on his instincts, guile and street smarts to see justice done. As he sets off on the chase, though, he must remember to watch where he steps…. This is the countryside, after all, and the streets most definitely are not paved with gold.
“The Night Strangers” by Chris Bohjalian, Crown Publishing Group, fiction hardcover, 400 pgs., $25.00
In a dusty corner of a basement in a rambling Victorian house in northern New Hampshire, a door has long been sealed shut with thirty-nine six-inch-long carriage bolts.
The home’s new owners are Chip and Emily Linton and their twin ten-year-old daughters. Together they hope to rebuild their lives there after Chip, an airline pilot, has to ditch his seventy-seat regional jet in Lake Champlain after double engine failure. Unlike “the Miracle on the Hudson,” however, most of the passengers aboard Flight 1611 die on impact or drown. The body count? Thirty-nine—a coincidence not lost on Chip when he discovers the number of bolts in that basement door. Meanwhile, Emily finds herself wondering about the women in this sparsely populated White Mountain village—self-proclaimed herbalists—and their interest in her fifth-grade daughters. Are the women mad? Or is it her husband, in the wake of the tragedy, whose grip on sanity has become desperately tenuous?
The result is a poignant and powerful ghost story with all the hallmarks readers have come to expect from bestselling novelist Chris Bohjalian: a palpable sense of place, an unerring sense of the demons that drive us, and characters we care about deeply.
The difference this time? Some of those characters are dead.

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Dockside Bookshop – Your Caribbean Bookstore
Our new hours are Monday – Friday, 8a.m. to 6p.m.
Saturday, 9a.m. – 5p.m.
Sunday, 11a.m. – 3p.m.
Local Author Signs Books at Dockside
Dockside Bookshop will hold a book signing for local author Gillian Royes from 5-6 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 18, at Havensight, St. Thomas.
Royes begins his detective series with “The Goat Woman of Largo Bay,” which features Shad, a bartender in a fishing village in Jamaica, who is the community problem-solver and right hand of Eric, an American who owns the bar and a hotel that has been left in ruins by a hurricane.
BOOK PICKS FOR THE SEASON
“The Son of Neptune” by Rick Riordan
“The Son of Neptune” by Rick Riordan, Hyperion Books (Harper), fiction – young adult, 513 pgs., $12.00
In The Lost Hero, three demigods named Jason, Piper and Leo made their first visit to Camp Half-Blood, where they inherited a quest:
Seven half-bloods shall answer the call,
To storm or fire the world must fall.
An oath to keep with a final breath,
And foes bear arms to the Doors of Death.
Who are the other four mentioned in the prophesy? The answer may lie in another camp miles away, where a new camper has shown up and appears to be the son of Neptune, god of the sea. . . .
Percy is confused. When he awoke from his long sleep, he didn’t know much more than his name. Somehow he has managed to make it to a camp for half-bloods, but it doesn’t ring any bells with him. The only thing he can recall from his past is another name: Annabeth.
Hazel is supposed to be dead. When she lived before, she didn’t do a very good job of it. Now, because of a mistake she made back then, the future of the world is at risk. Hazel wishes she could ride away from it all on the stallion that appears in her dreams.
Frank is a klutz. His grandmother says he is descended from heroes, but he doesn’t see it. His bulky physique makes him feel like an ox, especially in front of Hazel, his closest friend. He trusts her completely—enough to share the secret he holds close to his heart.
Beginning at the “other” camp for half-bloods and extending as far as the land beyond the gods, this breathtaking second installment in the Heroes of Olympus series introduces new demigods, revives fearsome monsters, and features other remarkable creatures, all destined to play a part in the Prophecy of Seven.
“Snuff” by Terry Pratchett, Harper, fiction hardcover, 416 pgs, $25.99
At long last, Lady Sybil has lured her husband, Sam Vimes, on a well-deserved holiday away from the crime and grime of Ankh-Morpork. But for the commander of the City Watch, relaxation in the country is anything but relaxing. The balls, the teas, the muck—not to mention all that fresh air and birdsong—are more than a bit taxing on a cynical city-born-and-bred copper.
Yet a policeman will find a crime anywhere if he decides to look hard enough, and it’s not long before a body is discovered, and Sam—out of his jurisdiction, out of his element, and out of bacon sandwiches (thanks to his well-meaning wife)—must rely on his instincts, guile and street smarts to see justice done. As he sets off on the chase, though, he must remember to watch where he steps…. This is the countryside, after all, and the streets most definitely are not paved with gold.
“The Night Strangers” by Chris Bohjalian, Crown Publishing Group, fiction hardcover, 400 pgs., $25.00
In a dusty corner of a basement in a rambling Victorian house in northern New Hampshire, a door has long been sealed shut with thirty-nine six-inch-long carriage bolts.
The home’s new owners are Chip and Emily Linton and their twin ten-year-old daughters. Together they hope to rebuild their lives there after Chip, an airline pilot, has to ditch his seventy-seat regional jet in Lake Champlain after double engine failure. Unlike “the Miracle on the Hudson,” however, most of the passengers aboard Flight 1611 die on impact or drown. The body count? Thirty-nine—a coincidence not lost on Chip when he discovers the number of bolts in that basement door. Meanwhile, Emily finds herself wondering about the women in this sparsely populated White Mountain village—self-proclaimed herbalists—and their interest in her fifth-grade daughters. Are the women mad? Or is it her husband, in the wake of the tragedy, whose grip on sanity has become desperately tenuous?
The result is a poignant and powerful ghost story with all the hallmarks readers have come to expect from bestselling novelist Chris Bohjalian: a palpable sense of place, an unerring sense of the demons that drive us, and characters we care about deeply.
The difference this time? Some of those characters are dead.