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HomeNewsArchivesTea Time in Frederiksted Melds Culture and Community

Tea Time in Frederiksted Melds Culture and Community

July 3, 2008 — Culture and community came together Wednesday at the Emancipation Tea held on the eve of Emancipation Day. A brightly lit bandstand was set up on King Street near Fort Frederik and the street was filled with people sitting on folding chairs enjoying the music, poetry, comedy and oratory.
Not only was the street filled, but the more than 350 audience members spilled over into Frederiksted Park taking seats at the tables there and over into an area around the Gazebo near the Customs House.
Much of the entertainment was impromptu such as the poetry reading by Richard Schrader. His reading of a poem about freedom in which he broke into song brought a huge round of applause from the crowd.
Also contributing poetry he had written was Sen. Terrence "Positive" Nelson. Nelson said he would read two poems, but, in the end, he said he could not help himself, and read a third.
Keeping up a humorous banter and spreading good feelings between the acts were Asta Williams and Wayne "Bully" Petersen. The former was the chairman of the tea and the latter the vice chairman.
The traditional Tea Meeting, according to sponsors the History, Culture & Tradition Foundation, is an opportunity for ordinary people to demonstrate the valued Afro-Caribbean cultural tradition of speechmaking.
During a traditional tea, a choir would sing spirituals and 19th-century parlor songs and ballads. The choir taking that duty Wednesday was the Millennium Choir from the Friedensfeld Midland Moravian Church.
During intermission Rigidims served complimentary sweet buns and bush tea.
The St. Thomas Heritage Dancers gave a performance, as did the Crucian Country Pick-Up Band, and Trinidad native Paul Keens-Douglas gave a motivational address.
The Department of Tourism cosponsored the tea. Former Tourism Director Pam Richards gave the welcome and Brad Nugent, present assistant commissioner, also gave remarks.
"I am really encouraged to see all the people here celebrating their yesterday, today and tomorrow," said Nugent.

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July 3, 2008 -- Culture and community came together Wednesday at the Emancipation Tea held on the eve of Emancipation Day. A brightly lit bandstand was set up on King Street near Fort Frederik and the street was filled with people sitting on folding chairs enjoying the music, poetry, comedy and oratory.
Not only was the street filled, but the more than 350 audience members spilled over into Frederiksted Park taking seats at the tables there and over into an area around the Gazebo near the Customs House.
Much of the entertainment was impromptu such as the poetry reading by Richard Schrader. His reading of a poem about freedom in which he broke into song brought a huge round of applause from the crowd.
Also contributing poetry he had written was Sen. Terrence "Positive" Nelson. Nelson said he would read two poems, but, in the end, he said he could not help himself, and read a third.
Keeping up a humorous banter and spreading good feelings between the acts were Asta Williams and Wayne "Bully" Petersen. The former was the chairman of the tea and the latter the vice chairman.
The traditional Tea Meeting, according to sponsors the History, Culture & Tradition Foundation, is an opportunity for ordinary people to demonstrate the valued Afro-Caribbean cultural tradition of speechmaking.
During a traditional tea, a choir would sing spirituals and 19th-century parlor songs and ballads. The choir taking that duty Wednesday was the Millennium Choir from the Friedensfeld Midland Moravian Church.
During intermission Rigidims served complimentary sweet buns and bush tea.
The St. Thomas Heritage Dancers gave a performance, as did the Crucian Country Pick-Up Band, and Trinidad native Paul Keens-Douglas gave a motivational address.
The Department of Tourism cosponsored the tea. Former Tourism Director Pam Richards gave the welcome and Brad Nugent, present assistant commissioner, also gave remarks.
"I am really encouraged to see all the people here celebrating their yesterday, today and tomorrow," said Nugent.

Back Talk


Share your reaction to this news with other Source readers. Please include headline, your name and city and state/country or island where you reside.