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Charlotte Amalie
Saturday, June 25, 2022
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The Importance of Restoring the Reefs

Dear Source:
As a diver, "continental enviro" and the former Executive Director of the St. Croix Environmental Association, I am pleased to finally hear that some action may now be taken by DPNR to once and for all enforce the ban on gillnet fishing that is ruining the once healthy coral reef system surrounding St. Croix.
Certainly, natural causes have had an impact on the surrounding coral reefs and if not stressed further, the reef system can eventually recover. However, the cumulative effect of muddy water run-off, raw sewage overflows and the use of the gillnets have stressed the reefs to the breaking point.
A lot has already been said about how horrible the gillnets are. The use of these nets are banned just about everywhere because they do so much damage.
To restore a healthy reef system to the beautiful coast of St. Croix would have countless benefits to the well being of the entire community. If the economy of the island is truly dependant of the tourist industry, stewardship of the marine resources should be the highest priority.
Creating and supporting sustainable systems to prevent coastal erosion and run-off, to creatively reuse water for agricultural production instead of the ocean dumping of millions of gallons of sewage per day and to nurture the coral reefs back to health are all attainable goals.
DPNR can now show leadership at this time and enforce the rules to ban gillnet fishing.

Megan Shoenfelt
Wooster, Ohio

Editor's note: We welcome and encourage readers to keep the dialogue going by responding to Source commentary. Letters should be e-mailed with name and place of residence to source@viaccess.net.

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Power rotation schedule.WAPA ALERT:

STT/STJ— Please be advised the following is a tentative rotation schedule of when feeders will be impacted. The schedule is based on load demand and subject to change. 1:00 am – 3:00 am Feeders 5A, 6A and 8A will be impacted | 3:00 am – 5:00 am Feeders 10B, 6B and 7B will be impacted | 5:00 am – 7:00 am Feeders 8B, 7E and 9C will be impacted | 8:00 am - 10:00 am Feeders 9E, 7C and 6A will be impacted. Once again, all of the timeframes listed are estimates and designed to help with planning and preparation. We apologize for the inconvenience and thank you for your ongoing patience as we work to resolve this issue.

WHAT FEEDER AM I ON?
www.viwapa.vi/docs/default-source/default-document-library/2018_feeder_listings---stt-stj.pdf?sfv...
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Power rotation schedule.

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Curious what is going on with 7A as it is not listed in the rotation and just seems to be OUT?!

Is 7A part of the rotation? It’s out right now

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Dear Source:
As a diver, "continental enviro" and the former Executive Director of the St. Croix Environmental Association, I am pleased to finally hear that some action may now be taken by DPNR to once and for all enforce the ban on gillnet fishing that is ruining the once healthy coral reef system surrounding St. Croix.
Certainly, natural causes have had an impact on the surrounding coral reefs and if not stressed further, the reef system can eventually recover. However, the cumulative effect of muddy water run-off, raw sewage overflows and the use of the gillnets have stressed the reefs to the breaking point.
A lot has already been said about how horrible the gillnets are. The use of these nets are banned just about everywhere because they do so much damage.
To restore a healthy reef system to the beautiful coast of St. Croix would have countless benefits to the well being of the entire community. If the economy of the island is truly dependant of the tourist industry, stewardship of the marine resources should be the highest priority.
Creating and supporting sustainable systems to prevent coastal erosion and run-off, to creatively reuse water for agricultural production instead of the ocean dumping of millions of gallons of sewage per day and to nurture the coral reefs back to health are all attainable goals.
DPNR can now show leadership at this time and enforce the rules to ban gillnet fishing.

Megan Shoenfelt
Wooster, Ohio

Editor's note: We welcome and encourage readers to keep the dialogue going by responding to Source commentary. Letters should be e-mailed with name and place of residence to source@viaccess.net.