85.7 F
Charlotte Amalie
Saturday, June 25, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesLight Bulbs Might Do More Harm Than Good

Light Bulbs Might Do More Harm Than Good

Dear Source:

Before everyone rushes headlong onto the CFL bandwagon, they would be smart to look at the not-so-good side of those bulbs.
The EPA may not consider CFLs to legally be a hazardous waste, but their guidelines suggest otherwise. CFL's have mercury in them. They need to be handled and disposed with the precautions and respect we supposedly also give TV and computer monitors, batteries, painting chemicals, motor oil and other defined hazardous wastes.
Can our island landfills and roadsides handle yet another controversial pollutant?
Most telling, look at these EPA recommended actions for home use; imagine the consequences in a business environment, public area or store:
Safe cleanup precautions: If a CFL breaks in your home, open nearby windows to disperse any vapor that may escape, carefully sweep up the fragments (do NOT use your hands) and wipe the area with a disposable paper towel to remove all glass fragments. Do not use a vacuum. Place all fragments in a sealed plastic bag and follow disposal instructions above.
Wolf Leonard
St Thomas/Jacksonville, Fla.

Editor's note: We welcome and encourage readers to keep the dialogue going by responding to Source commentary. Letters should be e-mailed with name and place of residence to source@viaccess.net.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Keeping our community informed is our top priority.
If you have a news tip to share, please call or text us at 340-228-8784.




Support local + independent journalism in the U.S. Virgin Islands

Unlike many news organizations, we haven't put up a paywall – we want to keep our journalism as accessible as we can. Our independent journalism costs time, money and hard work to keep you informed, but we do it because we believe that it matters. We know that informed communities are empowered ones. If you appreciate our reporting and want to help make our future more secure, please consider donating.

STAY CONNECTED

20,771FansLike
4,755FollowersFollow

FROM FACEBOOK

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
Load more
Dear Source:

Before everyone rushes headlong onto the CFL bandwagon, they would be smart to look at the not-so-good side of those bulbs.
The EPA may not consider CFLs to legally be a hazardous waste, but their guidelines suggest otherwise. CFL's have mercury in them. They need to be handled and disposed with the precautions and respect we supposedly also give TV and computer monitors, batteries, painting chemicals, motor oil and other defined hazardous wastes.
Can our island landfills and roadsides handle yet another controversial pollutant?
Most telling, look at these EPA recommended actions for home use; imagine the consequences in a business environment, public area or store:
Safe cleanup precautions: If a CFL breaks in your home, open nearby windows to disperse any vapor that may escape, carefully sweep up the fragments (do NOT use your hands) and wipe the area with a disposable paper towel to remove all glass fragments. Do not use a vacuum. Place all fragments in a sealed plastic bag and follow disposal instructions above.
Wolf Leonard
St Thomas/Jacksonville, Fla.

Editor's note: We welcome and encourage readers to keep the dialogue going by responding to Source commentary. Letters should be e-mailed with name and place of residence to source@viaccess.net.