80.3 F
Charlotte Amalie
Tuesday, May 24, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesPreservation Meets 21st Century Technology

Preservation Meets 21st Century Technology

March 7, 2006 – Friends of Virgin Islands National Park, the University of Maine, National Park Service, and Virgin Islands Humanities Council have teamed up to continue groundbreaking work "virtually" preserving historic structures in Virgin Islands National Park on St. John.
Within the 14,689 acres of the park lies the largest contiguous area of remains of plantations worked by enslaved Africans under Danish colonial rule in the Caribbean. It contains the remains of the most complete representation of the period of colonial rule and the post-emancipation era including plantations, forts, military barracks and other structures.
In 2004, professors and students from the University of Maine ran a pilot project using the Leinster Bay Ruins on St. John as the study subject in an effort to use a new technique to preserve the ruins. Along with National Park Service archeologist Ken Wild, they continue their work and will hold public presentations highlighting their pioneering technique. This promising approach uses several virtual preservation methods based on computer graphics and geographic information system software.
The public is invited to attend these free presentations at 11 a.m., on March 10, at Leinster Bay Ruins, located directly behind the beach at Leinster Bay and at 11 a.m., on March 13, at Cinnamon Bay Archeology Lab on the beach at Cinnamon Bay on St. John.
For more information, contact Karen Brady at the Friends office at 779-4940.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Keeping our community informed is our top priority.
If you have a news tip to share, please call or text us at 340-228-8784.




Support local + independent journalism in the U.S. Virgin Islands

Unlike many news organizations, we haven't put up a paywall – we want to keep our journalism as accessible as we can. Our independent journalism costs time, money and hard work to keep you informed, but we do it because we believe that it matters. We know that informed communities are empowered ones. If you appreciate our reporting and want to help make our future more secure, please consider donating.

STAY CONNECTED

20,771FansLike
4,720FollowersFollow

FROM FACEBOOK

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
Load more
March 7, 2006 - Friends of Virgin Islands National Park, the University of Maine, National Park Service, and Virgin Islands Humanities Council have teamed up to continue groundbreaking work "virtually" preserving historic structures in Virgin Islands National Park on St. John.
Within the 14,689 acres of the park lies the largest contiguous area of remains of plantations worked by enslaved Africans under Danish colonial rule in the Caribbean. It contains the remains of the most complete representation of the period of colonial rule and the post-emancipation era including plantations, forts, military barracks and other structures.
In 2004, professors and students from the University of Maine ran a pilot project using the Leinster Bay Ruins on St. John as the study subject in an effort to use a new technique to preserve the ruins. Along with National Park Service archeologist Ken Wild, they continue their work and will hold public presentations highlighting their pioneering technique. This promising approach uses several virtual preservation methods based on computer graphics and geographic information system software.
The public is invited to attend these free presentations at 11 a.m., on March 10, at Leinster Bay Ruins, located directly behind the beach at Leinster Bay and at 11 a.m., on March 13, at Cinnamon Bay Archeology Lab on the beach at Cinnamon Bay on St. John.
For more information, contact Karen Brady at the Friends office at 779-4940.