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Coast Guard Moves Myron Dalmida to Icebreaker

June 8, 2004 – Coast Guard Master Chief Electrician's Mate Myron Dalmida, a Virgin Islander, crossed the Coast Guard Cutter Polar Sea's gangway and has embarked on a three-year assignment aboard the 399-foot ship that has a displacement of 13,500 tons.
"You are about to embark on a unique experience," says the Ship's Web site. "Polar Sea and its sister ship, Polar Star, are two of the largest ships in the U.S. Coast Guard and the world's most powerful non-nuclear icebreakers. The ship routinely operates in the Bering Sea, Chukchi Seas, the Arctic Ocean, the Southern Ocean, and on and around the Antarctic continent."
Apparently, the temperature in some of those regions is not too cold for Dalmida, who has sailed the waters of Alaska many times on two previous shipboard assignments. However, he said, "When it's dangerously freezing outside, I will be in the warmest area of the ship working on the electrical plant, engineering, and main propulsion systems."
The Polar Sea was especially designed to operate in both polar regions. Six diesel-electric engines, or three gas turbines for thick ice, provide ample power to three propellers. The reinforced hull is shaped to ride up on the ice, which is then broken under the ship's weight. Polar Sea can accommodate Coast Guard helicopters which are carried during polar deployments for science and logistics support. Comfortable berthing is provided for a crew of approximately 180 men and women, while recreational facilities include a library, exercise room, and daily movies to maintain crew morale during lengthy deployments.
Additionally, the ship is equipped to function as a major scientific platform with five internal laboratories and accommodations for as many as 35 scientists and technicians. The ship can accommodate an additional seven portable science laboratories on deck. Real-time satellite images processed aboard aid in ice navigation, science planning, and weather forecasting.
Dalmida's earlier assignments were based in Miami, Fla.; Hawaii; Guam; New Orleans, La.; St. Louis, Mo.; Groton, Conn.; Boston, Mass.; Governors Island, N.Y.; Panama City, Fla.; and Kodiak, Alaska. His personal awards include three Coast Guard Achievement Medals, three Commandant's Letters of Commendation, seven Coast Guard Good Conduct Medals, and a Coast Guard Sea Service.
A 1978 graduate of Charlotte Amalie High School with 25 years of military service, he travels annually to the Virgin Islands to conduct recruiting.
Editor's note: This article was provided by Coast Guard Lt. Alvin Dalmida Jr.
Publisher's note : Like the St. Thomas Source now? Find out how you can love us twice as much — and show your support for the islands' free and independent news voice … click here.

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June 8, 2004 - Coast Guard Master Chief Electrician's Mate Myron Dalmida, a Virgin Islander, crossed the Coast Guard Cutter Polar Sea's gangway and has embarked on a three-year assignment aboard the 399-foot ship that has a displacement of 13,500 tons.
"You are about to embark on a unique experience," says the Ship's Web site. "Polar Sea and its sister ship, Polar Star, are two of the largest ships in the U.S. Coast Guard and the world's most powerful non-nuclear icebreakers. The ship routinely operates in the Bering Sea, Chukchi Seas, the Arctic Ocean, the Southern Ocean, and on and around the Antarctic continent."
Apparently, the temperature in some of those regions is not too cold for Dalmida, who has sailed the waters of Alaska many times on two previous shipboard assignments. However, he said, "When it's dangerously freezing outside, I will be in the warmest area of the ship working on the electrical plant, engineering, and main propulsion systems."
The Polar Sea was especially designed to operate in both polar regions. Six diesel-electric engines, or three gas turbines for thick ice, provide ample power to three propellers. The reinforced hull is shaped to ride up on the ice, which is then broken under the ship's weight. Polar Sea can accommodate Coast Guard helicopters which are carried during polar deployments for science and logistics support. Comfortable berthing is provided for a crew of approximately 180 men and women, while recreational facilities include a library, exercise room, and daily movies to maintain crew morale during lengthy deployments.
Additionally, the ship is equipped to function as a major scientific platform with five internal laboratories and accommodations for as many as 35 scientists and technicians. The ship can accommodate an additional seven portable science laboratories on deck. Real-time satellite images processed aboard aid in ice navigation, science planning, and weather forecasting.
Dalmida's earlier assignments were based in Miami, Fla.; Hawaii; Guam; New Orleans, La.; St. Louis, Mo.; Groton, Conn.; Boston, Mass.; Governors Island, N.Y.; Panama City, Fla.; and Kodiak, Alaska. His personal awards include three Coast Guard Achievement Medals, three Commandant's Letters of Commendation, seven Coast Guard Good Conduct Medals, and a Coast Guard Sea Service.
A 1978 graduate of Charlotte Amalie High School with 25 years of military service, he travels annually to the Virgin Islands to conduct recruiting.
Editor's note: This article was provided by Coast Guard Lt. Alvin Dalmida Jr.
Publisher's note : Like the St. Thomas Source now? Find out how you can love us twice as much -- and show your support for the islands' free and independent news voice ... click here.