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HomeNewsArchives7 CASES OF DOG POISONING REPORTED

7 CASES OF DOG POISONING REPORTED

Dec. 25, 2001 – Christmas Eve was not exactly peaceful for at least one Virgin Islander. While many gathered to celebrate the birth of hope and love, veterinarian Dr. Andrew Williamson was pulled away from his celebration to work feverishly through much of the night trying to save the lives of several dogs brought to him suffering from strychnine poisoning.
One of the guests at Williamson's Christmas Eve celebration, animal advocate Christine O'Keefe, called the Source early Christmas morning asking help in spreading the word about the poisonings on the North Side.
Williamson said Tuesday morning five dogs were brought in Monday night. Two died.
"I've got two on the table right now. I can probably save them," he said.
He had this advice: "Anyone who values their pets should keep them close by today. And if you have any that haven't come home since last night, you should go look for them."
The dogs that have been brought in lived on the North Side between Mafolie and Bonne Resolution, Williamson said.
Strychnine causes failure of the central nervous system and induces seizures which ultimately cause death. Symptoms include excessive salivating, staggering and dizziness.
Williamson said the deadly poison is typically delivered in chicken legs or some other treat dogs like.
It's not the first time this has happened, he said.
"But what I don't understand is why they would chose to do this on Christmas," he said. "It's obscenely cruel."

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Dec. 25, 2001 – Christmas Eve was not exactly peaceful for at least one Virgin Islander. While many gathered to celebrate the birth of hope and love, veterinarian Dr. Andrew Williamson was pulled away from his celebration to work feverishly through much of the night trying to save the lives of several dogs brought to him suffering from strychnine poisoning.
One of the guests at Williamson's Christmas Eve celebration, animal advocate Christine O'Keefe, called the Source early Christmas morning asking help in spreading the word about the poisonings on the North Side.
Williamson said Tuesday morning five dogs were brought in Monday night. Two died.
"I've got two on the table right now. I can probably save them," he said.
He had this advice: "Anyone who values their pets should keep them close by today. And if you have any that haven't come home since last night, you should go look for them."
The dogs that have been brought in lived on the North Side between Mafolie and Bonne Resolution, Williamson said.
Strychnine causes failure of the central nervous system and induces seizures which ultimately cause death. Symptoms include excessive salivating, staggering and dizziness.
Williamson said the deadly poison is typically delivered in chicken legs or some other treat dogs like.
It's not the first time this has happened, he said.
"But what I don't understand is why they would chose to do this on Christmas," he said. "It's obscenely cruel."