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'VANILLA SKY': MORE THAN A MIND TRIP

Dec. 18, 2001 – "Vanilla Sky" is definitely a bit of a mind stretch. Movies should challenge us to think and feel, but it was a bit disjointed to me, despite some fine performances.
Tom Cruise plays "David Aames," a self-obsessed millionaire playboy magazine publisher. Cameron Diaz plays "Julie Gianni," David's sexy friend and occasional lover who is obsessed with him and sees their relationship as more than it is.
Penelope Cruz plays the dark-haired bombshell "Sofia Serrano," who steals David's heart with a smile and a wickedly delightful Spanish accent. Cruise and Cruz click immediately on screen (and in real life as well now).
The plot is a tangled weaving of love at first sight, redemption, near death experiences, dream sequences, jealousy and the shame of wasted lives. David makes a simple decision that changes his life forever. Two realities exist after that, and the audience is thrown back and forth trying to keep up with which is which.
The film combines some of the choppy piecemeal sequences of Quentin Tarantino's "Pulp Fiction" and the bottom-line "Fatal Attraction" message that you don't want a woman scorned to be mad at you.
There is a strong underlying message that we should appreciate the people and things we have in case it's all taken from us.
Despite the confusing story line that forces one to go through mental upheavals about every five minutes, Cruise, Cruz and Diaz give excellent performances.
I don't think Tom Cruise has stretched himself as an actor this much since "Born on the Fourth of July." Cameron Diaz shows her versatility, as effective as a seductive love interest as she was the funny ingénue in "There's Something about Mary." And Penelope Cruz is charming.
The film was written and directed by Cameron Crowe ("Almost Famous," "Jerry Maguire"). It also stars Kurt Russell and Jason Lee.
Rated R for sexuality and strong language, it's playing at Market Square East on St. Thomas.

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Dec. 18, 2001 – "Vanilla Sky" is definitely a bit of a mind stretch. Movies should challenge us to think and feel, but it was a bit disjointed to me, despite some fine performances.
Tom Cruise plays "David Aames," a self-obsessed millionaire playboy magazine publisher. Cameron Diaz plays "Julie Gianni," David's sexy friend and occasional lover who is obsessed with him and sees their relationship as more than it is.
Penelope Cruz plays the dark-haired bombshell "Sofia Serrano," who steals David's heart with a smile and a wickedly delightful Spanish accent. Cruise and Cruz click immediately on screen (and in real life as well now).
The plot is a tangled weaving of love at first sight, redemption, near death experiences, dream sequences, jealousy and the shame of wasted lives. David makes a simple decision that changes his life forever. Two realities exist after that, and the audience is thrown back and forth trying to keep up with which is which.
The film combines some of the choppy piecemeal sequences of Quentin Tarantino's "Pulp Fiction" and the bottom-line "Fatal Attraction" message that you don't want a woman scorned to be mad at you.
There is a strong underlying message that we should appreciate the people and things we have in case it's all taken from us.
Despite the confusing story line that forces one to go through mental upheavals about every five minutes, Cruise, Cruz and Diaz give excellent performances.
I don't think Tom Cruise has stretched himself as an actor this much since "Born on the Fourth of July." Cameron Diaz shows her versatility, as effective as a seductive love interest as she was the funny ingénue in "There's Something about Mary." And Penelope Cruz is charming.
The film was written and directed by Cameron Crowe ("Almost Famous," "Jerry Maguire"). It also stars Kurt Russell and Jason Lee.
Rated R for sexuality and strong language, it's playing at Market Square East on St. Thomas.