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Charlotte Amalie
Wednesday, July 6, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesACCIDENT COULD HAVE ENDED TRAGICALLY

ACCIDENT COULD HAVE ENDED TRAGICALLY

Dear Source,
I just witnessed the most terrifying moment in my entire history of V.I. driving. I had just arrived at the bottom of Crown Mountain Road, in St. Thomas, where it intersects with the Moravian Highway.
I was awaiting the traffic light to change in my favor. I've adopted the habit of waiting for a few seconds even when the light turns green to avoid being broadsided by drivers rushing through the amber and many times just-turned-red, traffic lights.
I noted the amber light and a car rushing to beat the red going west to east. Simultaneously, I observed a youth on one of those low riding bicycles whoosing past me to my left. Perhaps he underestimated his momentum, as he continued without slowing down straight out onto the highway, and directly into the path of that oncoming eastbound car. I heard myself screaming in horror as I saw the car brake. He slowed, but unfortunately, he still hit the youth. Then the light turned green, and angry honking car horns behind me propelled me to cross through the intersection.
I immediately pulled into the adjacent parking lot to see if I would be needing to call the police and an ambulance.
At first I saw only the driver jumping out of the car. Then, miraculously, I saw the youth stand up, stunned but seemingly unharmed. His bike? Not so lucky – mash up badly.
Still I wasn't sure if he was hurt or not, so I went ahead and called the police. They connected me to the ambulance department, who entered into a conversation with me which was seemingly to try and determine whether or not the ambulance was actually needed.
Now, I have three important observations and points to make about this experience. First, to all parents: please, talk to your bike riding children, tell them how much you love and cherish them, and passionately encourage them to exercise extreme caution while bike riding. Next, to all drivers: please, please, obey the V.I. traffic laws, slow down when you reach intersections, remember that amber light means slow down, proceed with caution, red light coming soon and for goodness sake, DON'T RUN THROUGH A JUST TURNED RED LIGHT! And, finally, to the V.I. Police Department and affiliated ambulance service: I recognize how seriously stretched to the limits you are for personnel and equipment, but please, please, please, don't force a witness to an accident to try and determine if anybody is in actually in need of help or not.
Priscilla Lynn
St. Thomas, V.I.

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Dear Source,
I just witnessed the most terrifying moment in my entire history of V.I. driving. I had just arrived at the bottom of Crown Mountain Road, in St. Thomas, where it intersects with the Moravian Highway.
I was awaiting the traffic light to change in my favor. I've adopted the habit of waiting for a few seconds even when the light turns green to avoid being broadsided by drivers rushing through the amber and many times just-turned-red, traffic lights.
I noted the amber light and a car rushing to beat the red going west to east. Simultaneously, I observed a youth on one of those low riding bicycles whoosing past me to my left. Perhaps he underestimated his momentum, as he continued without slowing down straight out onto the highway, and directly into the path of that oncoming eastbound car. I heard myself screaming in horror as I saw the car brake. He slowed, but unfortunately, he still hit the youth. Then the light turned green, and angry honking car horns behind me propelled me to cross through the intersection.
I immediately pulled into the adjacent parking lot to see if I would be needing to call the police and an ambulance.
At first I saw only the driver jumping out of the car. Then, miraculously, I saw the youth stand up, stunned but seemingly unharmed. His bike? Not so lucky - mash up badly.
Still I wasn't sure if he was hurt or not, so I went ahead and called the police. They connected me to the ambulance department, who entered into a conversation with me which was seemingly to try and determine whether or not the ambulance was actually needed.
Now, I have three important observations and points to make about this experience. First, to all parents: please, talk to your bike riding children, tell them how much you love and cherish them, and passionately encourage them to exercise extreme caution while bike riding. Next, to all drivers: please, please, obey the V.I. traffic laws, slow down when you reach intersections, remember that amber light means slow down, proceed with caution, red light coming soon and for goodness sake, DON'T RUN THROUGH A JUST TURNED RED LIGHT! And, finally, to the V.I. Police Department and affiliated ambulance service: I recognize how seriously stretched to the limits you are for personnel and equipment, but please, please, please, don't force a witness to an accident to try and determine if anybody is in actually in need of help or not.
Priscilla Lynn
St. Thomas, V.I.