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HomeNewsArchives'DEAR LIAR' AT ANTILLES SCHOOL SUNDAY

'DEAR LIAR' AT ANTILLES SCHOOL SUNDAY

Jerome Kilty's two-actor play "Dear Liar" will be presented in the auditorium of Antilles School on Sunday, March 18 at 7:30 p.m. This performance will be an extension to the community of the theater workshop presented by the Hartt School of the Performing Arts to the students at Antilles School in the week that follows.
Because of restrictions of the Equity union regarding the actors and the copyright laws pertaining to the play, it is not permissible to charge admission to this performance. However, voluntary donations will be gratefully accepted to defray the cost of transportation and housing for the actors and workshop participants. The evening will be made possible in part by the aid of the Virgin Islands Council on the Arts. Seating is limited, so those wishing to attend are encouraged to call Mrs. Jackie Nelthropp at 776-1600 to reserve seats.
In gentler, slower times, before telephones and email and chat rooms and all of the sordidness that can go with them all, there was sometime such a thing as a "chaste affair" carried out by amorous billet-doux between sophisticated and self-restrained adults. From 1899 to 1939, such a relationship existed between Irish dramatist George Bernard Shaw and Beatrice "Stella" Tanner, better known as Mrs. Patrick Campbell. In addition to having penned more plays than Shakespeare, Shaw is still famous as a literary critic, free thinker, socialist spokesman, supporter of women's rights, exponent of economic equality and advocate for the simplification of English spelling. Lesser known to us post-Moderns, Mrs. Patrick Campbell was a British actress of great talent, famous for her portrayal of passionate, intelligent women. She won renown for her performances as Juliet, Hedda Gabler, Lady Macbeth, Mrs. Alving in "Ghosts," Clytemnestra in "Electra," and most of the challenging and "meaty" roles of the serious theater. At one time, she was the more famous member of the couple. At the age of 68 and in need of funds, she finally made her screen debut in Riptide, afterward appearing in several films. However, the role which makes her immortal is her role as muse to Shaw. It was she whom Shaw had in mind as the perfect actress to play the part of Eliza Doolittle as he wrote "Pygmalion."
Alan Dent published the collected correspondence of Shaw and Campbell in 1952. Six years later (decades before the play "Love Letters") Jerome Kilty constructed this evening of theater from their letters. In the course of the play, we see Shaw go from formal to gracious to passionate and spellbound by the woman he calls "the enchantress." These letters by two brilliant people who loved language and each other range from droll and witty, to amorous and passionate, to volatile and cantankerous. Seattle Times theater critic Misha Berson has observed: "The two sent one another passionate mash notes, accusatory rants, theatrical musings, and finally, sympathetic tidings from one aging icon to another."
Starring in this production will be Johanna Morrison as Mrs. Patrick Campbell and Alan Rust as George Bernard Shaw. Johanna Morrison is a familiar face from stage and television. Among a very long list of credits on the small screen, she has appeared in "Diagnosis Murder," "Matlock," "Perry Mason," "One Life to Live," "Infamous Love" (PBS), and fifteen programs of Brevard Orchestral Concerts (PBS). She is married to Malcolm Morrison, Dean of the Hartt School. Together they were founders of the North Carolina Shakespeare Festival. She has performed extensively in Equity regional theater throughout the United States and on the London stage and in BBC productions.
Alan Rust is no stranger to St. Thomas. This year's workshop will be his eighth presentation to Antilles students since he was first brought down at the instigation of the late Katharine Streibich in 1989. For island audiences he has performed in Shaw's "Don Juan in Hell," Bill C. Davis's "Mass Appeal" and "A Lesson from Aloes" by South African Athol Fugard. Distinguished as an actor, director and pedagogue, Rust is the director of the Theater Division of the Hartt School. Prior to his appointment at Hartt, Alan Rust served with distinction at Ohio University, North Carolina School of the Arts and the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. Passionately committed to theater training, Alan Rust served several terms as national president of the American Theater Guild. He has appeared in numerous theaters throughout the United States and in Europe including, most recently, Stage West as Charles in "Blythe Spirit," the Cleveland Playhouse as Ernie in "It's a Wonderful Life," and at the Hartford Stage Company in "A Christmas Carol." This past summer he celebrated his twentieth season as Artistic Director of the Monomoy Theater on Cape Cod by directing Inherit the Wind, appearing as Captain Hook in "Peter Pan," and playing the role he will fill in "Dear Liar" opposite Julie Harris.

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Jerome Kilty's two-actor play "Dear Liar" will be presented in the auditorium of Antilles School on Sunday, March 18 at 7:30 p.m. This performance will be an extension to the community of the theater workshop presented by the Hartt School of the Performing Arts to the students at Antilles School in the week that follows.
Because of restrictions of the Equity union regarding the actors and the copyright laws pertaining to the play, it is not permissible to charge admission to this performance. However, voluntary donations will be gratefully accepted to defray the cost of transportation and housing for the actors and workshop participants. The evening will be made possible in part by the aid of the Virgin Islands Council on the Arts. Seating is limited, so those wishing to attend are encouraged to call Mrs. Jackie Nelthropp at 776-1600 to reserve seats.
In gentler, slower times, before telephones and email and chat rooms and all of the sordidness that can go with them all, there was sometime such a thing as a "chaste affair" carried out by amorous billet-doux between sophisticated and self-restrained adults. From 1899 to 1939, such a relationship existed between Irish dramatist George Bernard Shaw and Beatrice "Stella" Tanner, better known as Mrs. Patrick Campbell. In addition to having penned more plays than Shakespeare, Shaw is still famous as a literary critic, free thinker, socialist spokesman, supporter of women's rights, exponent of economic equality and advocate for the simplification of English spelling. Lesser known to us post-Moderns, Mrs. Patrick Campbell was a British actress of great talent, famous for her portrayal of passionate, intelligent women. She won renown for her performances as Juliet, Hedda Gabler, Lady Macbeth, Mrs. Alving in "Ghosts," Clytemnestra in "Electra," and most of the challenging and "meaty" roles of the serious theater. At one time, she was the more famous member of the couple. At the age of 68 and in need of funds, she finally made her screen debut in Riptide, afterward appearing in several films. However, the role which makes her immortal is her role as muse to Shaw. It was she whom Shaw had in mind as the perfect actress to play the part of Eliza Doolittle as he wrote "Pygmalion."
Alan Dent published the collected correspondence of Shaw and Campbell in 1952. Six years later (decades before the play "Love Letters") Jerome Kilty constructed this evening of theater from their letters. In the course of the play, we see Shaw go from formal to gracious to passionate and spellbound by the woman he calls "the enchantress." These letters by two brilliant people who loved language and each other range from droll and witty, to amorous and passionate, to volatile and cantankerous. Seattle Times theater critic Misha Berson has observed: "The two sent one another passionate mash notes, accusatory rants, theatrical musings, and finally, sympathetic tidings from one aging icon to another."
Starring in this production will be Johanna Morrison as Mrs. Patrick Campbell and Alan Rust as George Bernard Shaw. Johanna Morrison is a familiar face from stage and television. Among a very long list of credits on the small screen, she has appeared in "Diagnosis Murder," "Matlock," "Perry Mason," "One Life to Live," "Infamous Love" (PBS), and fifteen programs of Brevard Orchestral Concerts (PBS). She is married to Malcolm Morrison, Dean of the Hartt School. Together they were founders of the North Carolina Shakespeare Festival. She has performed extensively in Equity regional theater throughout the United States and on the London stage and in BBC productions.
Alan Rust is no stranger to St. Thomas. This year's workshop will be his eighth presentation to Antilles students since he was first brought down at the instigation of the late Katharine Streibich in 1989. For island audiences he has performed in Shaw's "Don Juan in Hell," Bill C. Davis's "Mass Appeal" and "A Lesson from Aloes" by South African Athol Fugard. Distinguished as an actor, director and pedagogue, Rust is the director of the Theater Division of the Hartt School. Prior to his appointment at Hartt, Alan Rust served with distinction at Ohio University, North Carolina School of the Arts and the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. Passionately committed to theater training, Alan Rust served several terms as national president of the American Theater Guild. He has appeared in numerous theaters throughout the United States and in Europe including, most recently, Stage West as Charles in "Blythe Spirit," the Cleveland Playhouse as Ernie in "It's a Wonderful Life," and at the Hartford Stage Company in "A Christmas Carol." This past summer he celebrated his twentieth season as Artistic Director of the Monomoy Theater on Cape Cod by directing Inherit the Wind, appearing as Captain Hook in "Peter Pan," and playing the role he will fill in "Dear Liar" opposite Julie Harris.