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Charlotte Amalie
Tuesday, July 5, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesJAMES CONTRADICTS OFFICIAL ON LICENSING MEETING

JAMES CONTRADICTS OFFICIAL ON LICENSING MEETING

In a statement Friday, Lt. Gov. Gerard Luz James II sought to correct statements made by Elissa Runyon, chairwoman of the Real Estate Appraisers Board, that were reported Thursday in the Source.
The article reported on James' press conference concerning the licensure of government employees in the Tax Assessor's office. Runyon told the Source that the appraisers board had sent a letter to James in late November requesting a meeting to discuss licensing.
"That statement is grossly incorrect," James said. He noted that while the board's letter made reference to the V.I. Code as it relates to the practices of the Tax Assessor's Office and employee qualifications, a meeting was never requested.
Rather, according to James, the letter states, " … the Board is considering the issuance of a Cease and Desist Order that would take effect on Jan. 1, 2002, prohibiting the Tax Assessor and any employees within that office, from undertaking any appraisal activity until they have completed the application and examination requirements."
The letter further stated, James said, that he and the tax assessor would have until Dec. 1, 2000, to give the board a written statement outlining their position on the requirement for licensing tax assessors in the Virgin Islands. The letter concluded that the appraisers board would make a decision about further evidentiary proceedings after receiving an answer.
Thursday's press conference provided that answer. Among other matters James addressed, he said his office was aware of only one U.S. jurisdiction that required persons in the assessor's office who make tax assessments to be duly licensed appraisers.
The Source asked Runyon on Thursday for a copy of the letter, which she was unable to produce. Beryl Freeman, James' secretary, was unable to find the letter as of 5 p.m. Thursday, before the original article was published in the Source.

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In a statement Friday, Lt. Gov. Gerard Luz James II sought to correct statements made by Elissa Runyon, chairwoman of the Real Estate Appraisers Board, that were reported Thursday in the Source.
The article reported on James' press conference concerning the licensure of government employees in the Tax Assessor's office. Runyon told the Source that the appraisers board had sent a letter to James in late November requesting a meeting to discuss licensing.
"That statement is grossly incorrect," James said. He noted that while the board's letter made reference to the V.I. Code as it relates to the practices of the Tax Assessor's Office and employee qualifications, a meeting was never requested.
Rather, according to James, the letter states, " … the Board is considering the issuance of a Cease and Desist Order that would take effect on Jan. 1, 2002, prohibiting the Tax Assessor and any employees within that office, from undertaking any appraisal activity until they have completed the application and examination requirements."
The letter further stated, James said, that he and the tax assessor would have until Dec. 1, 2000, to give the board a written statement outlining their position on the requirement for licensing tax assessors in the Virgin Islands. The letter concluded that the appraisers board would make a decision about further evidentiary proceedings after receiving an answer.
Thursday's press conference provided that answer. Among other matters James addressed, he said his office was aware of only one U.S. jurisdiction that required persons in the assessor's office who make tax assessments to be duly licensed appraisers.
The Source asked Runyon on Thursday for a copy of the letter, which she was unable to produce. Beryl Freeman, James' secretary, was unable to find the letter as of 5 p.m. Thursday, before the original article was published in the Source.