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HomeNewsArchivesSWIMMERS SHOULD BE ON THE ALERT FOR JELLYFISH

SWIMMERS SHOULD BE ON THE ALERT FOR JELLYFISH

V.I. National Park officials are warning swimmers to be on the look-out for jellyfish in the waters around St. John, especially on the North Shore.
Judy Shafer, acting superintendent of the park, said reports of people being stung have reached the park. Some of the calls came from Caneel Bay Resort, she said.
Jellyfish are normally found in larger numbers in V.I. waters during the months of August and September. However, Shafer said it is not unusual to see them earlier.
Moon jellyfish, the most common type found locally, produce a mild sting that lasts a short time.
Other less common types, the Sea Wasp and Portugese Man-O-War can cause a more severe reaction, and should be avoided.
Planning and Natural Resources issued a warning in early July about the Warty jellyfish. DPNR said the pinkish colored jellyfish is highly toxic.
For more information about the waters around St. John call Paul Thomas at 776-6201, ext. 252.

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V.I. National Park officials are warning swimmers to be on the look-out for jellyfish in the waters around St. John, especially on the North Shore.
Judy Shafer, acting superintendent of the park, said reports of people being stung have reached the park. Some of the calls came from Caneel Bay Resort, she said.
Jellyfish are normally found in larger numbers in V.I. waters during the months of August and September. However, Shafer said it is not unusual to see them earlier.
Moon jellyfish, the most common type found locally, produce a mild sting that lasts a short time.
Other less common types, the Sea Wasp and Portugese Man-O-War can cause a more severe reaction, and should be avoided.
Planning and Natural Resources issued a warning in early July about the Warty jellyfish. DPNR said the pinkish colored jellyfish is highly toxic.
For more information about the waters around St. John call Paul Thomas at 776-6201, ext. 252.