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Charlotte Amalie
Thursday, August 11, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesBORNN FIRING: UNTIMELY, UNFORTUNATE

BORNN FIRING: UNTIMELY, UNFORTUNATE

We have to wonder at Gov. Charles W. Turnbull's thinking. We also have to wonder whom he's taking advice from.
The firing of acting Tourism Commissioner Michael Bornn was a very untimely and unfortunate move.
While we fully understand that Bornn was something of a loose cannon, and while we appreciate the need of the boss to have some control over his employees, we think that a more creative approach to Bornn's outspokenness might have been more productive.
This territory is in dire straits. Tourism is our only product. We have had three commissioners in the last 12 months and the one who seemed to have the overwhelming confidence of the public is now gone – right at the start of the 1999-2000 winter tourism season.
We hear the frustration and even rage of the community over this action everywhere we turn.
We feel the anxiety over what this means in terms of a sorely needed successful tourist season.
How can we come back from this blow to our image as a destination?
Who is going to replace this dynamic – albeit roguish – leader?
We are aware of the governor's penchant for vacillation. We could hope that he would change his mind on the Bornn issue. But even if he did, we don't think Bornn would come back. And we can't blame him.
When a private business owner fires an employee who refuses to abide by the employer's policy initiatives, that affects the employee, his family and the business owner.
But this is not a private business. This is the public sector and we've heard many, many politicos say you can't run expect the government to run like a business. In this case we must agree.
When you fire someone like Michael Bornn, someone who brought hope and encouragement to a depressed community, it affects the entire territory.
The governor said it himself: Bornn had the support of people who never agree on anything.
It is not Bornn who lost the confidence of the people in this scenario. It is the governor. Unfortunately, it is the people who will pay the price for the governor's ill-conceived move.

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We have to wonder at Gov. Charles W. Turnbull's thinking. We also have to wonder whom he's taking advice from.
The firing of acting Tourism Commissioner Michael Bornn was a very untimely and unfortunate move.
While we fully understand that Bornn was something of a loose cannon, and while we appreciate the need of the boss to have some control over his employees, we think that a more creative approach to Bornn's outspokenness might have been more productive.
This territory is in dire straits. Tourism is our only product. We have had three commissioners in the last 12 months and the one who seemed to have the overwhelming confidence of the public is now gone - right at the start of the 1999-2000 winter tourism season.
We hear the frustration and even rage of the community over this action everywhere we turn.
We feel the anxiety over what this means in terms of a sorely needed successful tourist season.
How can we come back from this blow to our image as a destination?
Who is going to replace this dynamic – albeit roguish – leader?
We are aware of the governor's penchant for vacillation. We could hope that he would change his mind on the Bornn issue. But even if he did, we don't think Bornn would come back. And we can't blame him.
When a private business owner fires an employee who refuses to abide by the employer's policy initiatives, that affects the employee, his family and the business owner.
But this is not a private business. This is the public sector and we've heard many, many politicos say you can't run expect the government to run like a business. In this case we must agree.
When you fire someone like Michael Bornn, someone who brought hope and encouragement to a depressed community, it affects the entire territory.
The governor said it himself: Bornn had the support of people who never agree on anything.
It is not Bornn who lost the confidence of the people in this scenario. It is the governor. Unfortunately, it is the people who will pay the price for the governor's ill-conceived move.