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Charlotte Amalie
Tuesday, August 16, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesWind Shear, Dry Air Do in Dorian

Wind Shear, Dry Air Do in Dorian

Tropical Storm Dorian fell apart by the 5 p.m. Saturday update from the National Hurricane Center and is now considered a tropical wave.

“There is no closed circulation,” meteorologist Walter Snell said Saturday at the National Weather Service in San Juan.

Snell said Dorian was done in by upper level shear and some intake of drier air.

He said that the storm still bears watching, but it looks as if most of the moisture will be to the north of it, so the territory won’t see anything more than normal showers.

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What’s left of Dorian still has sustained winds of 40 mph but that won’t be a problem for the Virgin Islands. Snell said the storm would “just squeak by us.” Gale force winds extend outward 70 miles from the center.

At the 5 p.m. update, Dorian’s remnants were at 18.9 degrees north latitude and 54.7 degrees west longitude. This puts it at a latitude just to the north of the Virgin Islands.

The storm was racing along at 24 mph on a westward track.

While Dorian’s end is good news, Snell cautioned that hurricane season still has a long way to go, and residents shouldn’t let down their guard.

However, the next 10 days look good with nothing headed toward the territory.

“It’s the summer doldrums,” he said.

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Tropical Storm Dorian fell apart by the 5 p.m. Saturday update from the National Hurricane Center and is now considered a tropical wave.

“There is no closed circulation,” meteorologist Walter Snell said Saturday at the National Weather Service in San Juan.

Snell said Dorian was done in by upper level shear and some intake of drier air.

He said that the storm still bears watching, but it looks as if most of the moisture will be to the north of it, so the territory won’t see anything more than normal showers.

What’s left of Dorian still has sustained winds of 40 mph but that won’t be a problem for the Virgin Islands. Snell said the storm would “just squeak by us.” Gale force winds extend outward 70 miles from the center.

At the 5 p.m. update, Dorian’s remnants were at 18.9 degrees north latitude and 54.7 degrees west longitude. This puts it at a latitude just to the north of the Virgin Islands.

The storm was racing along at 24 mph on a westward track.

While Dorian’s end is good news, Snell cautioned that hurricane season still has a long way to go, and residents shouldn’t let down their guard.

However, the next 10 days look good with nothing headed toward the territory.

“It’s the summer doldrums,” he said.