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HomeNewsArchivesHospital Transformed into a Carnival for All Ages

Hospital Transformed into a Carnival for All Ages

The pageantry and thrill of “everything Carnival” was celebrated for Roy L. Schneider Medical Center seniors, patients and hospital staff alike as majorettes, quadrille dancers and newly crowned royalty took the stage on Monday.

A taste of April’s Carnival events to come was offered up to an appreciative audience who might not have otherwise had the chance to experience this year’s “Tropical Scene for 2013.”

St. Thomas resident Marcella Jennings said, “I love that the Carnival committee makes this available every year.” Jennings said she understood how the patients feel “to see the young children and know they are not missing out on Carnival.”

Three generations of the Jennings family were on hand to cheer the evening’s enthusiastic performers.

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Monday’s event was officially opened by newly crowned Carnival Queen Adisha Penn and her royal court, much to the delight of the crowd of about 300 seated on the hospital’s portico outside the main entrance.

Mistress of Ceremonies Lisa Wynne-Magnuson no sooner introduced the famous Milo’s Kings than the specially built stage was filled with a vast spectrum of color and sound in the form of the Sebastian Majorettes.

Vibrant reds, yellows and fluorescent blues and greens made up the rhinestone-jeweled costumes and a well-rehearsed baton routine.

“The work is hard but worth it,” said 9-year-old majorette Christinique Elizee. “I have been dancing since I was 3 and love it. It’s fun!”

Preparations for this years fête began months ago as did the costume designs and assembly.

The sequence of entertainers brought more glamour and nonstop energy. Among those performers were the Holy Family Quadrille dancers in traditional dress, as well as mocko jumbies, junior and senior tropical masqueraders, the Addelita Cancryn Junior High School 21st Century drum line and dancers.

Much like the annual adult parade, festivities at the hospital drew to a close with an appearance by the Traditional Indians dance group.

For some it was a taste of Carnival revelry to come; for others it was the chance to reminisce while gathering with family and friends, recalling memories of Carnivals past.

Additional events include the Junior Calypso Competition on Tuesday at Lionel Roberts Stadium. Cultural Night: Celebrating King and Queen of the Band is set for Wednesday, as well as the contest for best Carnival costume.

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The pageantry and thrill of “everything Carnival” was celebrated for Roy L. Schneider Medical Center seniors, patients and hospital staff alike as majorettes, quadrille dancers and newly crowned royalty took the stage on Monday.

A taste of April’s Carnival events to come was offered up to an appreciative audience who might not have otherwise had the chance to experience this year’s “Tropical Scene for 2013.”

St. Thomas resident Marcella Jennings said, “I love that the Carnival committee makes this available every year.” Jennings said she understood how the patients feel “to see the young children and know they are not missing out on Carnival.”

Three generations of the Jennings family were on hand to cheer the evening’s enthusiastic performers.

Monday’s event was officially opened by newly crowned Carnival Queen Adisha Penn and her royal court, much to the delight of the crowd of about 300 seated on the hospital’s portico outside the main entrance.

Mistress of Ceremonies Lisa Wynne-Magnuson no sooner introduced the famous Milo’s Kings than the specially built stage was filled with a vast spectrum of color and sound in the form of the Sebastian Majorettes.

Vibrant reds, yellows and fluorescent blues and greens made up the rhinestone-jeweled costumes and a well-rehearsed baton routine.

“The work is hard but worth it,” said 9-year-old majorette Christinique Elizee. “I have been dancing since I was 3 and love it. It’s fun!”

Preparations for this years fête began months ago as did the costume designs and assembly.

The sequence of entertainers brought more glamour and nonstop energy. Among those performers were the Holy Family Quadrille dancers in traditional dress, as well as mocko jumbies, junior and senior tropical masqueraders, the Addelita Cancryn Junior High School 21st Century drum line and dancers.

Much like the annual adult parade, festivities at the hospital drew to a close with an appearance by the Traditional Indians dance group.

For some it was a taste of Carnival revelry to come; for others it was the chance to reminisce while gathering with family and friends, recalling memories of Carnivals past.

Additional events include the Junior Calypso Competition on Tuesday at Lionel Roberts Stadium. Cultural Night: Celebrating King and Queen of the Band is set for Wednesday, as well as the contest for best Carnival costume.