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Charlotte Amalie
Wednesday, August 10, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesMcDuffie Pleads ‘Not Guilty’ to Racketeering and Embezzlement

McDuffie Pleads ‘Not Guilty’ to Racketeering and Embezzlement

Stanley McDuffie, the alleged "brains" behind Her Majesty’s Credit Union, entered a plea of “not guilty” Thursday to charges of embezzlement, obtaining money by false pretenses, conspiracy and racketeering.

McDuffie did not actually appear at his arraignment hearing Thursday on St. Thomas, but V.I. Superior Court Judge Kathleen Mackay explained that he was allowed to travel out of the country on the condition that he waive extradition rights – meaning that he would return to the territory if arrested or charged elsewhere for another crime.

McDuffie also did not appear to have his own lawyer at Thursday’s hearing, which prompted a discussion on the state of his finances. In the end, Mackay said the court would check McDuffie’s financials to determine whether he should be appointed an attorney.

Standing in for the day, defense attorney Carol McDonald entered a plea of “not guilty” on behalf of McDuffie.

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Mackay assigned the case to V.I. Superior Court Judge Adam Christian.

McDuffie, 46, was advised of his rights earlier this month after being arrested and charged in a suit filed by Her Majesty’s Credit Union customers in the territory and mainland who have claimed that they purchased certificates of deposit from the company but were later unable to withdrawn their funds.

Her Majesty’s Credit Union was allegedly created by McDuffie (under the name Stanley Roberson) and HMCU comptroller John Williams, and it served as the territorial counterpart of their Colorado-based company Jilapuhn Inc., according to court documents filed a year ago by the Securities Exchange Commission.

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Stanley McDuffie, the alleged "brains" behind Her Majesty’s Credit Union, entered a plea of “not guilty” Thursday to charges of embezzlement, obtaining money by false pretenses, conspiracy and racketeering.

McDuffie did not actually appear at his arraignment hearing Thursday on St. Thomas, but V.I. Superior Court Judge Kathleen Mackay explained that he was allowed to travel out of the country on the condition that he waive extradition rights – meaning that he would return to the territory if arrested or charged elsewhere for another crime.

McDuffie also did not appear to have his own lawyer at Thursday’s hearing, which prompted a discussion on the state of his finances. In the end, Mackay said the court would check McDuffie’s financials to determine whether he should be appointed an attorney.

Standing in for the day, defense attorney Carol McDonald entered a plea of “not guilty” on behalf of McDuffie.

Mackay assigned the case to V.I. Superior Court Judge Adam Christian.

McDuffie, 46, was advised of his rights earlier this month after being arrested and charged in a suit filed by Her Majesty’s Credit Union customers in the territory and mainland who have claimed that they purchased certificates of deposit from the company but were later unable to withdrawn their funds.

Her Majesty’s Credit Union was allegedly created by McDuffie (under the name Stanley Roberson) and HMCU comptroller John Williams, and it served as the territorial counterpart of their Colorado-based company Jilapuhn Inc., according to court documents filed a year ago by the Securities Exchange Commission.