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Monday, August 8, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesGovernor and First Lady Mourn Youth Sports Advocate “Dagger” Lee

Governor and First Lady Mourn Youth Sports Advocate “Dagger” Lee

Governor John P. deJongh Jr. and First Lady Cecile deJongh offered condolences today to the family of Charles Ray Lee, a pioneer in promoting youth sports on St. Croix and a longtime supporter of the Virgin Islands Special Olympics. Lee, who was known by his friends as “Dagger,” passed away earlier this month at the age of 75.
“Dagger was a tremendous advocate for children across the territory. He played an integral role in ensuring the Special Olympics was always a success in the Virgin Islands, and he made a difference in the lives of countless young athletes. An inspiration and friend to many, he encouraged all children to embrace life and to follow one’s dreams,” Gov. deJongh said.
Lee ran a men’s basketball league at Claude O. Markoe gym in the early 1970s, and he refereed basketball and flag football for the St. Croix Interscholastic Athletic Association. He served for more than a decade as president of West Little League and was a supporter of many youth teams across the island, especially those his grandchildren played on.
"Dagger will be greatly missed, for his spirit of compassion and endless dedication to the children of the Virgin Islands. His legacy is an inspiring reminder to all of us of the importance of working together to create a better world by fostering the acceptance and inclusion of all people. Through his efforts, countless Virgin Islands children experienced opportunities to develop their physical fitness, demonstrate courage, and experience joy with their families, other Special Olympics athletes and the broader community,” First Lady de Jongh said.
When his wife, Janice, was asked to administer some events for the Special Olympics, Dagger Lee got involved and brought several of his coworkers at Martin Marietta Alumina with him. For the last 25 years, Lee was clerk of course for the Special Olympic races and did whatever was needed to make sure the games ran smoothly. He was also a close friend and mentor to several Special Olympics athletes, to whom he opened up his home.
Still others knew Dagger as a member of the Friedensberg Moravian Church, where he sang in the choir.
The governor and first lady offer their condolences to Lee’s wife Janice of 56 years, his two surviving children, seven grandchildren and their extended family.

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Governor John P. deJongh Jr. and First Lady Cecile deJongh offered condolences today to the family of Charles Ray Lee, a pioneer in promoting youth sports on St. Croix and a longtime supporter of the Virgin Islands Special Olympics. Lee, who was known by his friends as “Dagger,” passed away earlier this month at the age of 75.
“Dagger was a tremendous advocate for children across the territory. He played an integral role in ensuring the Special Olympics was always a success in the Virgin Islands, and he made a difference in the lives of countless young athletes. An inspiration and friend to many, he encouraged all children to embrace life and to follow one’s dreams,” Gov. deJongh said.
Lee ran a men’s basketball league at Claude O. Markoe gym in the early 1970s, and he refereed basketball and flag football for the St. Croix Interscholastic Athletic Association. He served for more than a decade as president of West Little League and was a supporter of many youth teams across the island, especially those his grandchildren played on.
"Dagger will be greatly missed, for his spirit of compassion and endless dedication to the children of the Virgin Islands. His legacy is an inspiring reminder to all of us of the importance of working together to create a better world by fostering the acceptance and inclusion of all people. Through his efforts, countless Virgin Islands children experienced opportunities to develop their physical fitness, demonstrate courage, and experience joy with their families, other Special Olympics athletes and the broader community,” First Lady de Jongh said.
When his wife, Janice, was asked to administer some events for the Special Olympics, Dagger Lee got involved and brought several of his coworkers at Martin Marietta Alumina with him. For the last 25 years, Lee was clerk of course for the Special Olympic races and did whatever was needed to make sure the games ran smoothly. He was also a close friend and mentor to several Special Olympics athletes, to whom he opened up his home.
Still others knew Dagger as a member of the Friedensberg Moravian Church, where he sang in the choir.
The governor and first lady offer their condolences to Lee’s wife Janice of 56 years, his two surviving children, seven grandchildren and their extended family.