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HomeNewsArchivesVIPD Continues Crackdown on Illegal Cash-for-Gold Businesses

VIPD Continues Crackdown on Illegal Cash-for-Gold Businesses

Police throughout the territory are continuing to crack down on cash-for-gold trading, with Police Commissioner Novelle Francis Jr. warning businesses that they must register with the Department of Licensing and Consumer Affairs and follow rules laid out by the police.
Last week officers raided a St. Thomas business for alleged violations of those rules.
Saker Shalhout, 33, and Carolina Hussein, 26, were arrested after members of the VIPD Intelligence Unit, Criminal Investigation Bureau and VI Lottery Enforcement Officers conducted a sting operation at H&S Outlet located at No. 28 Raadets Gade.
Police said the suspects were not licensed to trade cash for gold and did not ask for identification from the seller.
Police said Shalhout and Hussein purchased a 24-inch gold necklace and an eight-inch gold hand to the chain for the sum of $1,200 from VIPD confidential informants.
Once the illegal transaction was made, officers entered the business and made the arrest. The suspects were charged with purchasing used precious metals without a license.
In April, police on St. Croix raided Eagle Mini Mart in Frederiksted after confidential informants sold gold there on two separate occasions without having to produce any identification.
The police in both districts continue to monitor businesses suspected in illegally trading cash for gold, linking the practice to robberies and murders in the territory.
Francis reminded merchants that anyone trading cash for gold must provide the buyer with a valid identification and provide their correct mailing address and telephone number.
After a sale of gold, the dealer is required to send the information to the police department. The gold must be held for 10 days so police can check that the sale is legitimate and the items sold do not match any jewelry reported stolen.

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Police throughout the territory are continuing to crack down on cash-for-gold trading, with Police Commissioner Novelle Francis Jr. warning businesses that they must register with the Department of Licensing and Consumer Affairs and follow rules laid out by the police.
Last week officers raided a St. Thomas business for alleged violations of those rules.
Saker Shalhout, 33, and Carolina Hussein, 26, were arrested after members of the VIPD Intelligence Unit, Criminal Investigation Bureau and VI Lottery Enforcement Officers conducted a sting operation at H&S Outlet located at No. 28 Raadets Gade.
Police said the suspects were not licensed to trade cash for gold and did not ask for identification from the seller.
Police said Shalhout and Hussein purchased a 24-inch gold necklace and an eight-inch gold hand to the chain for the sum of $1,200 from VIPD confidential informants.
Once the illegal transaction was made, officers entered the business and made the arrest. The suspects were charged with purchasing used precious metals without a license.
In April, police on St. Croix raided Eagle Mini Mart in Frederiksted after confidential informants sold gold there on two separate occasions without having to produce any identification.
The police in both districts continue to monitor businesses suspected in illegally trading cash for gold, linking the practice to robberies and murders in the territory.
Francis reminded merchants that anyone trading cash for gold must provide the buyer with a valid identification and provide their correct mailing address and telephone number.
After a sale of gold, the dealer is required to send the information to the police department. The gold must be held for 10 days so police can check that the sale is legitimate and the items sold do not match any jewelry reported stolen.