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Tuesday, July 5, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesNew Federal Judge Looks Forward to Less Adverserial Role

New Federal Judge Looks Forward to Less Adverserial Role

U.S. Magistrate Judge Ruth Miller was sworn in Thursday in an official ceremony in the main courtroom in the Ron De Lugo Federal Building. Miller has served on the bench since April, and was sworn in then in a private ceremony.
Thursday’s event was led by Judge Curtis V. Gomez, the chief judge of the V.I. District Court.
Miller said in an interview after the ceremony that her role would largely entail presiding over pretrial discovery in civil cases and the initial phases of criminal cases, including arraignments, and advice of rights and detention hearings.
The new role is offering Miller an opportunity that she’s wanted to pursue for some time.
“For nearly 30 years, I have dedicated myself to advocating positions for my clients, finding the best arguments, striving to win points and advance one side over another,” Miller said in her remarks at the ceremony. “I called it ‘fighting for a living.’"
Miller continued, "There has been a growing part of me, however, that longed to seek the middle ground, to channel that energy toward the fairest resolution of disputes, no matter who the eventual winner might be.
"And I wanted it to be easier for parties and lawyers to come together to solve those disputes, on a level playing field. After all … we are supposed to be in the business of helping people resolve their differences without beating one another over the head with clubs. Sometimes, however, litigating feels like we are still swinging those clubs.”
An attorney for over 27 years, Miller has spent the last 16 in the U.S. Virgin Islands, in her solo general practice and with the firm of Dudley, Topper and Feuerzeig.
Miller is an avid sailor, and it was her love of sailing that brought her to the territory, choosing upon arrival in 1993 to live aboard a sailboat in Red Hook.
Her work in the courtroom and her reputation as an excellent sailing competitor has made her a mainstay judge in such international sail boat races as the Rolex Regatta, where she adjudicates often testy cases.
“She certainly is a well respected international judge and really does a nice job at all the major events,” International Professional Race Officer David Brennan said. “I think she will do an excellent job as a federal judge.”

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U.S. Magistrate Judge Ruth Miller was sworn in Thursday in an official ceremony in the main courtroom in the Ron De Lugo Federal Building. Miller has served on the bench since April, and was sworn in then in a private ceremony.
Thursday’s event was led by Judge Curtis V. Gomez, the chief judge of the V.I. District Court.
Miller said in an interview after the ceremony that her role would largely entail presiding over pretrial discovery in civil cases and the initial phases of criminal cases, including arraignments, and advice of rights and detention hearings.
The new role is offering Miller an opportunity that she’s wanted to pursue for some time.
“For nearly 30 years, I have dedicated myself to advocating positions for my clients, finding the best arguments, striving to win points and advance one side over another,” Miller said in her remarks at the ceremony. “I called it 'fighting for a living.'"
Miller continued, "There has been a growing part of me, however, that longed to seek the middle ground, to channel that energy toward the fairest resolution of disputes, no matter who the eventual winner might be.
"And I wanted it to be easier for parties and lawyers to come together to solve those disputes, on a level playing field. After all ... we are supposed to be in the business of helping people resolve their differences without beating one another over the head with clubs. Sometimes, however, litigating feels like we are still swinging those clubs.”
An attorney for over 27 years, Miller has spent the last 16 in the U.S. Virgin Islands, in her solo general practice and with the firm of Dudley, Topper and Feuerzeig.
Miller is an avid sailor, and it was her love of sailing that brought her to the territory, choosing upon arrival in 1993 to live aboard a sailboat in Red Hook.
Her work in the courtroom and her reputation as an excellent sailing competitor has made her a mainstay judge in such international sail boat races as the Rolex Regatta, where she adjudicates often testy cases.
“She certainly is a well respected international judge and really does a nice job at all the major events,” International Professional Race Officer David Brennan said. “I think she will do an excellent job as a federal judge.”