87.5 F
Charlotte Amalie
Friday, August 19, 2022
HomeNewsArchives100 Potentially Exposed to Hepatitis B at Hospital

100 Potentially Exposed to Hepatitis B at Hospital

June 3, 2009 — Breaches of procedure reported recently in the kidney dialysis clinic at Gov. Juan F. Luis Hospital potentially exposed 100 patients to Hepatitis B virus, prompting the Department of Health to request information from the hospital for reporting to the Centers for Disease Control.
"I was informed by Dr. Robert Centeno of the exposure of approximately 100 dialysis patients to the Hepatitis B virus," acting Commissioner of Health Julia Sheen wrote to Gregory Calliste, executive director of the hospital. "It was also mentioned that said exposure was officially documented on May 10 and … patients' exposure to the HBV may have commenced from as far back as July 2008."
On Monday the hospital's governing board issued a statement about the breaches in protocol, emphasizing that no one was harmed. (See "Luis Hospital Reviewing Dialysis Procedures After Lapses.")
"It was a question of not following proper procedures for isolating anyone with an infection," said Carmelo Rivera, the board's chairman, on Monday. "It happened with one patient several times."
Now they are following established procedures and are being closely monitored, he said.
"There is no indication any patient was hurt," Rivera said. A follow-up from the hospital is due Friday, according to the board's statement.
Infection-control testing is a routine procedure of hemodialysis and to date no other patients have been affected, thanks in part to staff cleaning and sterilization procedures, according to the board's statement. The board notified Sheen, who has now requested further information to send to the CDC.

Back Talk

Share your reaction to this news with other Source readers. Please include headline, your name and city and state/country or island where you reside.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Keeping our community informed is our top priority.
If you have a news tip to share, please call or text us at 340-228-8784.




Support local + independent journalism in the U.S. Virgin Islands

Unlike many news organizations, we haven't put up a paywall – we want to keep our journalism as accessible as we can. Our independent journalism costs time, money and hard work to keep you informed, but we do it because we believe that it matters. We know that informed communities are empowered ones. If you appreciate our reporting and want to help make our future more secure, please consider donating.

FROM FACEBOOK

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
Load more
June 3, 2009 -- Breaches of procedure reported recently in the kidney dialysis clinic at Gov. Juan F. Luis Hospital potentially exposed 100 patients to Hepatitis B virus, prompting the Department of Health to request information from the hospital for reporting to the Centers for Disease Control.
"I was informed by Dr. Robert Centeno of the exposure of approximately 100 dialysis patients to the Hepatitis B virus," acting Commissioner of Health Julia Sheen wrote to Gregory Calliste, executive director of the hospital. "It was also mentioned that said exposure was officially documented on May 10 and … patients' exposure to the HBV may have commenced from as far back as July 2008."
On Monday the hospital's governing board issued a statement about the breaches in protocol, emphasizing that no one was harmed. (See "Luis Hospital Reviewing Dialysis Procedures After Lapses.")
"It was a question of not following proper procedures for isolating anyone with an infection," said Carmelo Rivera, the board's chairman, on Monday. "It happened with one patient several times."
Now they are following established procedures and are being closely monitored, he said.
"There is no indication any patient was hurt," Rivera said. A follow-up from the hospital is due Friday, according to the board's statement.
Infection-control testing is a routine procedure of hemodialysis and to date no other patients have been affected, thanks in part to staff cleaning and sterilization procedures, according to the board's statement. The board notified Sheen, who has now requested further information to send to the CDC.

Back Talk


Share your reaction to this news with other Source readers. Please include headline, your name and city and state/country or island where you reside.