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FAA Wraps Up Inspection of Territory's Airports

April 24, 2009 — Following two days of inspection, St. Thomas' Cyril E. King Airport has a little work ahead to keep the Federal Aviation Administration happy.
The FAA conducted its inspection of the airport on April 21 and 22. While a formal report is yet to be written up by inspector Randy Moseng, the exit interview pointed out a few deficiencies that will have to be addressed for the airport to be in compliance with FAA rules and requirements. The formal letter documenting the findings of the inspection is expected in the latter part of next week.
The inspection commended the airport for their annual Table Top meetings and the general maintenance of the airfield, said airport manager Jose Nazario.
The inspection, known as a FAA139 Compliance Inspection, found that pavement markings on the runway will have to be repainted and one directional-runway indication sign had to be modified, according to Dale Gregory, the V.I. Port Authority's engineering director.
The markings on the runway are augmented with tiny glass beads with help with reflectivity at night. "Some of the beads were fading," Nazario said.
The beads have been ordered and the work is scheduled to begin within 7 to 10 days, Nazario said.
Work on the markings will be scheduled after-hours to minimize impact on regular operations.
Gregory said that when he attends the debriefing he is mostly concerned with structural rather than operational requirements.
Some of the changes are the result of new requirements by the FAA, which issues advisory circulars that modify old rules and guidelines for airport.
Other recommendations that came out of the inspection included enhanced training for operational folks, Nazario said.
The inspection even goes over the grass between runways, identifying depressions in the grass.
While no problems with wildlife were found, the airport asked the inspector to recommend a preliminary wildlife assessment. The request came after recent events such as the landing of a plane on New York's Hudson River following a bird strike.
"Not because of any issue that we are experiencing on our airfield," Nazario said. "We just want to be proactive."
The assessment will be conducted by a professional biologist and will cost in the neighborhood of $60,000.
The inspection for Henry E. Rohlsen Airport on St. Croix concluded Friday.
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April 24, 2009 -- Following two days of inspection, St. Thomas' Cyril E. King Airport has a little work ahead to keep the Federal Aviation Administration happy.
The FAA conducted its inspection of the airport on April 21 and 22. While a formal report is yet to be written up by inspector Randy Moseng, the exit interview pointed out a few deficiencies that will have to be addressed for the airport to be in compliance with FAA rules and requirements. The formal letter documenting the findings of the inspection is expected in the latter part of next week.
The inspection commended the airport for their annual Table Top meetings and the general maintenance of the airfield, said airport manager Jose Nazario.
The inspection, known as a FAA139 Compliance Inspection, found that pavement markings on the runway will have to be repainted and one directional-runway indication sign had to be modified, according to Dale Gregory, the V.I. Port Authority's engineering director.
The markings on the runway are augmented with tiny glass beads with help with reflectivity at night. "Some of the beads were fading," Nazario said.
The beads have been ordered and the work is scheduled to begin within 7 to 10 days, Nazario said.
Work on the markings will be scheduled after-hours to minimize impact on regular operations.
Gregory said that when he attends the debriefing he is mostly concerned with structural rather than operational requirements.
Some of the changes are the result of new requirements by the FAA, which issues advisory circulars that modify old rules and guidelines for airport.
Other recommendations that came out of the inspection included enhanced training for operational folks, Nazario said.
The inspection even goes over the grass between runways, identifying depressions in the grass.
While no problems with wildlife were found, the airport asked the inspector to recommend a preliminary wildlife assessment. The request came after recent events such as the landing of a plane on New York's Hudson River following a bird strike.
"Not because of any issue that we are experiencing on our airfield," Nazario said. "We just want to be proactive."
The assessment will be conducted by a professional biologist and will cost in the neighborhood of $60,000.
The inspection for Henry E. Rohlsen Airport on St. Croix concluded Friday.
Back Talk


Share your reaction to this news with other Source readers. Please include headline, your name and city and state/country or island where you reside.