80.3 F
Charlotte Amalie
Sunday, July 3, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesNew Chiefs Take Over at Bureau of Corrections

New Chiefs Take Over at Bureau of Corrections

Oct. 1, 2008 — Attorney General Vincent Frazer, flanked by Gov. John deJongh Jr., on Wednesday introduced the newly appointed director of the Bureau of Corrections and the BOC's new assistant director at a Government House news conference on St. Thomas.
Effective Wednesday, Julius C. Wilson takes over the director's position vacated in December by Elwood York. Hillary Herman assumes the role of assistant director — a position that has been vacant for some time, the Department of Justice (DOJ) said.
"Both men bring an extraordinary amount of practical wisdom to their positions," said Frazer, who currently oversees the BOC. "We are fortunate to have recruited candidates who are as qualified, knowledgeable and experienced as these."
For the past 20 years, Wilson has worked at seven different facilities within the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Corrections. He has served as warden since 2003, according to a DOJ statement, and has been involved in developing policies, procedures, directives and philosophies.
"I firmly believe that the rudiments of a good correctional system are in place," Wilson told the press. "However, there is a need for training and reinforcement of the Bureau of Corrections rules and regulations and a new sense of accountability."
Wilson comes to the job on the heels of last week's prison break, reportedly aided by colluding BOC officers. Two of the three escapees from the Golden Grove Correctional Facility on St. Croix were captured — one killed by police fire, the other returned to the prison. A $10,000 reward has been posted for information leading to the arrest of the third. (See "Corrections Officers Implicated in Inmates' Escape.")
In describing his approach to penal reform, Wilson said, "Fair, firm and consistent treatment of prisoners and detainees will be the bureau's new motto." He continued, "We will restore the community's confidence in the bureau's ability to manage prisoners and detainees. The bureau will treat people as people while maintaining good order."
Working alongside Wilson will be "native son" Hermann, who for more than six years has served as director of corrections in St. Lucia.
"In the last five years alone, he led the deactivation of two of the island's prisons and consolidated both staff and inmates, while commissioning the opening of the new 500-bed Bordelais Correctional Facility, which he has overseen since its inception in January 2003," according to a DOJ statement. Hermann reportedly managed a $10-million budget and a staff of more than 200.
Frazer said he expects the two to play what he called a major role in revitalizing the bureau as it morphs into an independent agency, out from under the Justice Department. That transition is slated for October 2009.
The separation of the two was mandated by the Legislature, the governor said, and is something he supports to enable Justice to focus on "pure prosecution." It will be more costly but more efficient, he said.
"By separating it out, we'll have a much clearer picture of resources required and how to run the penal system in the U.S. Virgin Islands and give the resources to the Department of Justice to hire attorneys and prosecutors," deJongh said.
Back Talk Share your reaction to this news with other Source readers. Please include headline, your name and city and state/country or island where you reside.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Keeping our community informed is our top priority.
If you have a news tip to share, please call or text us at 340-228-8784.




Support local + independent journalism in the U.S. Virgin Islands

Unlike many news organizations, we haven't put up a paywall – we want to keep our journalism as accessible as we can. Our independent journalism costs time, money and hard work to keep you informed, but we do it because we believe that it matters. We know that informed communities are empowered ones. If you appreciate our reporting and want to help make our future more secure, please consider donating.

STAY CONNECTED

20,771FansLike
4,757FollowersFollow

FROM FACEBOOK

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
Load more
Oct. 1, 2008 -- Attorney General Vincent Frazer, flanked by Gov. John deJongh Jr., on Wednesday introduced the newly appointed director of the Bureau of Corrections and the BOC's new assistant director at a Government House news conference on St. Thomas.
Effective Wednesday, Julius C. Wilson takes over the director's position vacated in December by Elwood York. Hillary Herman assumes the role of assistant director -- a position that has been vacant for some time, the Department of Justice (DOJ) said.
"Both men bring an extraordinary amount of practical wisdom to their positions," said Frazer, who currently oversees the BOC. "We are fortunate to have recruited candidates who are as qualified, knowledgeable and experienced as these."
For the past 20 years, Wilson has worked at seven different facilities within the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Corrections. He has served as warden since 2003, according to a DOJ statement, and has been involved in developing policies, procedures, directives and philosophies.
"I firmly believe that the rudiments of a good correctional system are in place," Wilson told the press. "However, there is a need for training and reinforcement of the Bureau of Corrections rules and regulations and a new sense of accountability."
Wilson comes to the job on the heels of last week's prison break, reportedly aided by colluding BOC officers. Two of the three escapees from the Golden Grove Correctional Facility on St. Croix were captured -- one killed by police fire, the other returned to the prison. A $10,000 reward has been posted for information leading to the arrest of the third. (See "Corrections Officers Implicated in Inmates' Escape.")
In describing his approach to penal reform, Wilson said, "Fair, firm and consistent treatment of prisoners and detainees will be the bureau's new motto." He continued, "We will restore the community's confidence in the bureau's ability to manage prisoners and detainees. The bureau will treat people as people while maintaining good order."
Working alongside Wilson will be "native son" Hermann, who for more than six years has served as director of corrections in St. Lucia.
"In the last five years alone, he led the deactivation of two of the island's prisons and consolidated both staff and inmates, while commissioning the opening of the new 500-bed Bordelais Correctional Facility, which he has overseen since its inception in January 2003," according to a DOJ statement. Hermann reportedly managed a $10-million budget and a staff of more than 200.
Frazer said he expects the two to play what he called a major role in revitalizing the bureau as it morphs into an independent agency, out from under the Justice Department. That transition is slated for October 2009.
The separation of the two was mandated by the Legislature, the governor said, and is something he supports to enable Justice to focus on "pure prosecution." It will be more costly but more efficient, he said.
"By separating it out, we'll have a much clearer picture of resources required and how to run the penal system in the U.S. Virgin Islands and give the resources to the Department of Justice to hire attorneys and prosecutors," deJongh said.
Back Talk Share your reaction to this news with other Source readers. Please include headline, your name and city and state/country or island where you reside.