82.1 F
Charlotte Amalie
Tuesday, August 9, 2022
HomeNewsArchivesHow Do We Move On?

How Do We Move On?

Dear Source:
To discover the divisiveness and prejudice that is masqueraded as 'reparations', one need look no further than Shelly Moorhead's letter on "What is reparation". The very idea of reparation divides us all into "offenders" (whites) and "offended" (blacks) and takes into consideration only one particular item of our history without ever acknowledging the many other facts. According to Morehead and those who subscribe to this myopic view, it's as simple as black and white. I am white, therefore, I owe. You are black, you are owed. But, is it really that simple?
During the war to end slavery in America, tens of thousands of whites fought and died to end slavery. (I have ancestors who died there) And, all during the Civil Rights struggle in America, you need look no further than news footage to see the multitude of whites who marched for equal rights. (Some of my family were there). If you subscribe to Morehead's philosophy of 'owers' and 'owed', every black who lives under the American flag owes me a 'thank you', for the efforts of my ancestors on their behalf. Ridiculous? Of course. But, no more so than the assertions made in favor of 'reparations'.
I once read a letter wherein it was stated that reparations was not about money, but about 'moving on'. What is that? Are we going to appoint a Committee for Moving On? Will we establish an official council to accept apologies and when whites have made their declaration of shame, will each be issued a Pass to 'move on.? Can we then be free to lay this all to rest?
Of course not.
As long as we allow the discussion to be dictated by those who revel in their victim-hood we'll always be mired in the muck of yesterday. Because, if we ever do 'move on', those whose identity begins and ends with their skin color will be left behind.
Then how will they get the attention they crave?

D. Overton
Formerly of St. Croix

Editor's note: We welcome and encourage readers to keep the dialogue going by responding to Source commentary. Letters should be e-mailed with name and place of residence to visource@gmail.com.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Keeping our community informed is our top priority.
If you have a news tip to share, please call or text us at 340-228-8784.




Support local + independent journalism in the U.S. Virgin Islands

Unlike many news organizations, we haven't put up a paywall – we want to keep our journalism as accessible as we can. Our independent journalism costs time, money and hard work to keep you informed, but we do it because we believe that it matters. We know that informed communities are empowered ones. If you appreciate our reporting and want to help make our future more secure, please consider donating.

FROM FACEBOOK

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
Load more
Dear Source:
To discover the divisiveness and prejudice that is masqueraded as 'reparations', one need look no further than Shelly Moorhead's letter on "What is reparation". The very idea of reparation divides us all into "offenders" (whites) and "offended" (blacks) and takes into consideration only one particular item of our history without ever acknowledging the many other facts. According to Morehead and those who subscribe to this myopic view, it's as simple as black and white. I am white, therefore, I owe. You are black, you are owed. But, is it really that simple?
During the war to end slavery in America, tens of thousands of whites fought and died to end slavery. (I have ancestors who died there) And, all during the Civil Rights struggle in America, you need look no further than news footage to see the multitude of whites who marched for equal rights. (Some of my family were there). If you subscribe to Morehead's philosophy of 'owers' and 'owed', every black who lives under the American flag owes me a 'thank you', for the efforts of my ancestors on their behalf. Ridiculous? Of course. But, no more so than the assertions made in favor of 'reparations'.
I once read a letter wherein it was stated that reparations was not about money, but about 'moving on'. What is that? Are we going to appoint a Committee for Moving On? Will we establish an official council to accept apologies and when whites have made their declaration of shame, will each be issued a Pass to 'move on.? Can we then be free to lay this all to rest?
Of course not.
As long as we allow the discussion to be dictated by those who revel in their victim-hood we'll always be mired in the muck of yesterday. Because, if we ever do 'move on', those whose identity begins and ends with their skin color will be left behind.
Then how will they get the attention they crave?

D. Overton
Formerly of St. Croix

Editor's note: We welcome and encourage readers to keep the dialogue going by responding to Source commentary. Letters should be e-mailed with name and place of residence to visource@gmail.com.